Eritrea appoints first ambassador to Ethiopia in two decades

Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed (L) and President Isaias Afwerki of Eritrea (R) celebrate the opening of the Embassy of Eritrea in Ethiopia reopened following the official visit after twenty years, in Addis Ababa on July 13, 2018. (File photo: Michael Tewelde/AFP)
Updated 21 July 2018

Eritrea appoints first ambassador to Ethiopia in two decades

  • Ethiopia named Redwan Hussien, formerly Ethiopian ambassador to Ireland, to become Addis Ababa’s representative in Asmara
  • The rapprochement was triggered by the taking office in April of Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, who announced he wanted to implement a peace deal that ended the war

NAIROBI: Eritrea has appointed its first ambassador to neighboring Ethiopia in two decades, the government said on Saturday, as the former foes pushed on with a rapprochement.
The job went to Semere Russom, Eritrea’s current education minister and former ambassador to the United States, Information Minister Yemane Meskel said on Twitter.
Since signing an agreement in Asmara on July 9 to restore ties, Eritrean and Ethiopian leaders have moved swiftly to sweep away two decades of hostility since conflict erupted between the two neighbors in the Horn of Africa in 1998.
On Thursday, Ethiopia named Redwan Hussien, formerly Ethiopian ambassador to Ireland, to become Addis Ababa’s representative in Asmara.
The rapprochement was triggered by the taking office in April of Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, who announced he wanted to implement a peace deal that ended the war.
Both leaders have visited each other and Isaias this week reopened his country’s embassy in Addis Ababa.
Ethiopia’s national carrier Ethiopia Airlines on Wednesday made its first flight to Asmara in two decades and was greeted by dancers waving flags and flowers as families separated by the war and the ensuing hostilities made an emotional reunion.


FBI: Saudi shooter believed to have acted alone in US Navy base attack

Updated 14 min 33 sec ago

FBI: Saudi shooter believed to have acted alone in US Navy base attack

  • Special agent Rachel Rojas thanked Saudi Arabia for its cooperation in the investigation
  • Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani was shot dead after he opened fire and killed three people at the base in Florida

PENSACOLA: Investigators believe a Saudi Air Force lieutenant acted alone on Friday when he killed three people and wounded eight at a US Navy base in Pensacola, Florida before being fatally shot by police, the FBI said on Sunday.
Rachel Rojas, special agent in charge of the FBI’s Jacksonville office, said the shooter used a Glock model 45 9mm handgun that he had purchased legally in Florida.
“We currently assess there was one gunman who perpetrated this attack and no arrests have been made in this case,” Rojas, the lead investigator on the case, said at a news conference.
“We are looking very hard at uncovering his motive and I would ask for patience so we can get this right,” she said.
Authorities confirmed the suspect was a member of the Royal Saudi Air Force who was on the base as part of a US Navy training program designed to foster links with foreign allies.
The FBI identified him as Second Lt. Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani, 21.
A sheriff’s deputy fatally shot the gunman, authorities said, ending the second deadly attack at a US military base within a week. Within hours, Saudi Arabia’s King Salman had called US President Donald Trump to extend his condolences and pledge the Kingdom’s support in the investigation.
Rojas said there were several Saudi students who were close to the shooter and are cooperating with investigators.
“Their Saudi commanding officer has restricted them to base, and the Saudi government has pledged to fully cooperate with our investigation,” she said. “I thank the kingdom for their pledge of full and complete cooperation.”

Meanwhile, a second victim was identified as Airman Mohammed Sameh Haitham, 19, of St. Petersburg, Florida, who joined the Navy after graduating from high school last year, according to the Tampa Bay Times.
Haitham's mother, Evelyn Brady, herself a Navy veteran, said the commander of her son's school called her and told her Haitham had tried to stop the shooter.