Kylie Jenner’s birthday bag from Kuwaiti label Marzook

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Kylie Jenner celebrated her 21st birthday in Los Angeles this weekend.
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Her crystal orb bag, by Kuwaiti brand Marzook.
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Kylie Jenner celebrated her 21st birthday in Los Angeles this weekend.
Updated 12 August 2018

Kylie Jenner’s birthday bag from Kuwaiti label Marzook

  • The $2,495 bag, featuring a unique spherical silhouette and an optional chain strap, was sold out on the website
  • The Arab label’s line of accessories consists of exotic leather and skins, precious metals, and resins

JEDDAH: When Kylie Jenner, who is set to become the world’s youngest self-made female billionaire, celebrates her birthday, one can bet it will be no ordinary affair.

For her 21st birthday, she did not disappoint. The entire Kardashian-Jenner clan came together for not one, but two, celebrations for the reality TV star. The festivities began Thursday night and lasted into the wee hours of Friday. And the stand-out was a sparkling crystal orb bag by Kuwaiti brand Marzook sported by the birthday girl herself.
Kylie started off at Craig’s restaurant in Los Angeles with a hot pink satin dress by Peter Dundas, which boasted ‘80s-inspired shoulder pads, a cut-out center and bow detail.
Post-dinner, the cosmetics mogul changed into a more risqué birthday suit adorned with 70,000 Swarovski crystals. The outfit, also pink, was a custom-made tube top and cycling shorts by haute couture brand LaBourjoisie. Kylie added to the bling factor with Marzook’s matching bag.
The accessories maison, helmed by designer siblings Fahad and Shouq Al-Marzook, has made bags that have been sported by the likes of Amal Clooney, Lupita Nyong’o and Cara Delevingne.
The Arab label’s line of accessories consists of exotic leather and skins, precious metals, and resins. The designs draw inspiration from a mix of Eastern and Western cultures, reflecting the world in which the brand was developed. 
The $2,495 bag, featuring a unique spherical silhouette and an optional chain strap, was sold out on the website.
Kylie posted several images from her birthday parties on Instagram. Summing up her night, she wrote alongside a photo of the five famous sisters: “A bunch of baddies ... we’re 21 today.”
Among those who attended the after-party at Delilah’s were Delevingne, Ashley Benson, Chris Brown, Dave Chapelle, Jordan Clarkson, Kevin Durant, Bella Hadid, Winnie Harlow, Sophia Hutchins, Caitlyn Jenner, Stassi Karanikolaou, Draya Michele, French Montana, The Weeknd, Kanye West and Jordyn Woods.
Media sources reported that an unidentified woman was photographed being taken out of Kylie’s party by paramedics on a stretcher. While it was unclear whether she was a guest at the party, Caitlyn Jenner and close friend Sophia Hutchins were seen in the background.
Last month, the “Keeping Up With the Kardashians” star was declared the youngest person on the Forbes list of America’s Richest Self-Made Women, with an estimated net worth of $900 million.
However, some critics were quick to note that Kylie is anything but “self-made,” as she was born into wealth and fame.


UAE brand’s fresh approach to skincare looking good for future

Having lived in Dubai for more than seven years, Kathryn Jones learned a lot about the Middle Eastern market and the needs of people who live within the region. (Shutterstock)
Updated 25 May 2020

UAE brand’s fresh approach to skincare looking good for future

DUBAI: Skincare products can quite often sit on shelfs or in delivery vehicles for weeks and months, stored in unsuitable conditions.

And despite brands promoting them as organic and natural, some customers might question the effectiveness of products left lying around for long periods after being produced.

However, Kathryn Jones, founder of the UAE-based brand Kathryn Jones Hand Blended Serums, or KJ Serums for short, told Arab News how her company created fresh products every month for customers.

Jones, who is originally from Wales, in the UK, launched KJ Serums in 2017 and started her brand “out of necessity.” (Supplied)

“The concept of a freshly-made skincare serum is something quite different and our customers have really embraced it. They appreciate it’s a fresh product that must be used up within a month when it’s at its most active and effective and repurchased – almost like a food stuff,” she said.

Jones, who is originally from Wales, in the UK, launched KJ Serums in 2017 and started her brand “out of necessity.”

She added: “I simply could not afford the prices of some of the top skincare brands but still wanted excellent results.”

With her background in the biopharmaceuticals industry, she started experimenting and developing her own formulas. “The core proposition is ‘hand blended’ because that’s how it all started, by hand blending and perfecting the serum formulas myself here in the UAE,” she said.

Having lived in Dubai for more than seven years, the entrepreneur learned a lot about the Middle Eastern market and the needs of people who live within the region.

“Our climate here is extreme often for eight months or more of the year, especially in the Gulf region. A lot our customers will ask for a product that reduces oiliness and sheen on the skin and are reluctant to purchase products that contain a lot of oils, or are very heavily moisturizing,” Jones added.

The businesswoman believes the Middle East market is “wonderfully diverse” with different attitudes and expectations toward skincare products.

“Of course, this is a challenge to develop effective products which can address many different skin types and issues, but the market is truly receptive to new concepts,” she said.

Jones pointed out that with the current lockdown situation due to the ongoing spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), people had more time to care for their skin.

“The coronavirus pandemic has obviously confined us to our homes, and, given the steady increase in the number of enquiries we are receiving, it suggests consumers currently have more time to consider their online skincare purchases and perhaps have more time to invest in an effective routine,” she said.

On whether the COVID-19 outbreak would change the future of the skincare industry, Jones added: “I think that many consumers, either through necessity or out of a desire to support local brands might have chosen to source their products from different manufacturers and therefore brand loyalties may have been affected to a certain extent.”