US ambassador urges Britain to ditch support for Iran nuclear deal

US Ambassador to Britain Woody Johnson criticized Tehran for funding “proxy wars and malign activities.” (AFP)
Updated 15 August 2018

US ambassador urges Britain to ditch support for Iran nuclear deal

  • US Ambassador to Britain Woody Johnson criticized Tehran for funding “proxy wars and malign activities” instead of investing in its economy
  • Iranian President Hassan Rouhani said last week that Trump’s repudiation of the nuclear deal was illegal

LONDON: The United States urged Britain on Sunday to ditch its support for a 2015 nuclear deal with Iran and instead join forces with Washington to counter the global threat it says Tehran poses.
Despite opposition from European allies, US President Trump in May pulled the United States out of a deal between world powers and Tehran under which international sanctions were lifted in return for curbs on Iran’s nuclear program.
Since then, Britain, France and Germany have sought to keep the deal alive, while Trump has prepared new sanctions, saying a broader and more balanced deal is needed. Iran has denounced the sanctions as “US unilateralism.”
US Ambassador to Britain Woody Johnson criticized Tehran for funding “proxy wars and malign activities” instead of investing in its economy. He said Iran needed to make tangible and sustained changes to behave like a normal country.
“Until then, America is turning up the pressure and we want the UK by our side,” Johnson wrote in the Sunday Telegraph newspaper.
“It is time to move on from the flawed 2015 deal. We are asking global Britain to use its considerable diplomatic power and influence and join us as we lead a concerted global effort toward a genuinely comprehensive agreement.”
Asked about Johnson’s article, the British foreign office pointed to comments from Middle East minister Alistair Burt, who last week ruled out Britain going along with the United States.
Burt said the deal was an important part of regional security and that, with the European Union, the government was trying to protect British companies from the US sanctions when dealing with Iran. Britain remained open to talks with the United States on how to address concerns about Iran.
Iranian President Hassan Rouhani said last week that Trump’s repudiation of the nuclear deal was illegal and Iran would not yield to Washington’s renewed campaign to strangle Iran’s vital oil exports.
But protests have broken out in Iran as its currency has collapsed in value and inflation has soared. The protests have often begun with slogans against the high cost of living and alleged financial corruption, but quickly turned into anti-government rallies.


Trump to host next year's G7 summit at his Florida golf resort, White House says

Updated 33 min 44 sec ago

Trump to host next year's G7 summit at his Florida golf resort, White House says

  • Mulvaney told reporters the summit would take place at Doral on 2020, and that the administration selected Trump's resort
  • "Doral was by far and away the best physical facility for this meeting," he said at a news briefing

WASHINGTON: U.S. President Donald Trump will host next year's Group of Seven economic summit of developed world leaders at one of his own properties, the Trump National Doral golf resort near Miami, a White House official said on Thursday.
White House acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney said Trump would not profit from use of the property and defended the decision, which comes as the president faces ongoing criticism and congressional investigations over his finances and potential conflicts-of-interest.
Mulvaney told reporters the summit would take place at Doral on June 10-12, 2020, and that the administration selected Trump's resort after initially looking at about 12 potential locations in various other U.S. states.

Climate change will not be on the agenda of next year's G7 summit at US President Donald Trump's Florida golf club, the White House said on Thursday.
"Climate change will not be on the agenda," acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney told reporters.
"Doral was by far and away the best physical facility for this meeting," he said at a news briefing. "It's almost like they built this facility to host this event."
Mulvaney said the event would be "at cost" and that using the Trump site would save millions of dollars and was cheaper than the other potential sites.
Trump has repeatedly attacked Joe Biden, a leading Democratic presidential candidate and former vice-president, over his son's business ties in Ukraine and China, which Trump has repeatedly called corrupt, without evidence.
Asked how the president's use of his private business properties to host official government events differed from Trump's allegations against the Bidens, Mulvaney told reporters there would be no profit and said the family had made their money before Trump became president in January 2017.
Trump has said he is not involved with the day-to-day operations of his private company and that his sons run the business.