We take pride in our service, say female guides in Madinah

The number of female Hajj volunteers has risen dramatically this year. (SPA)
Updated 16 August 2018

We take pride in our service, say female guides in Madinah

  • The female guide monitors all the data for the pilgrim and records them in the automated system
  • In the event of death, she reports it to officials in the health care office, who complete the necessary procedures

MAKKAH: Female guides in Madinah expressed pride in their work as part of the Kingdom’s care of pilgrims during their time in the country.

Riham Husni told Saudi Press Agency (SPA) about her first experience of serving visitors to Madinah, the city of the Prophet. 

“I hope to continue for the next few years and to make my family and the National Guides Establishment, which has given me the chance to do this noble job, proud.”

Majida Habash said she has worked in this field since 2005, and now, female guides offer more services as part of a comprehensive plan for female visitors. 

Majida said every female guide has a role to play in health care, including accompanying a female pilgrim when she goes into hospital and following up the case until she receives treatment, leaves the hospital or is transferred to another facility. 

The female guide monitors all the data for the pilgrim and records them in the automated system. In the event of death, she reports it to officials in the health care office, who complete the necessary procedures. Majida stressed the keenness of all involved to develop the role of the teams working in this field. “Our main duty is to serve the pilgrims and offer them a helping hand,” said Hala Samman. “The job is different from any other job, and I hope to work in the years to come and to serve the pilgrims better,” she said.

“The female guides follow their health conditions in the hospital. It is a great honor to do this humanitarian work every day and provide the necessary requirements to help pilgrims perform their pilgrimage.”

Hayat Hawalah said she works in the morning shift, and records patients’ data in the system. It is an honorable experience that she hopes she can do for years to come.

Wedian Fakhrani said the work is done in coordination with all the other female guides to provide the best services for pilgrims and visitors during the pilgrimage season. Abrar Mahmoud said she provides care for pilgrims at King Fahd Hospital in Madinah and follows up their cases until they leave the hospital.

Inas Al-Fal praised the efforts of all female staff during the pilgrimage season, while Samah Abdel-Hafiz said she conducts her work through statistically monitoring sick pilgrims in King Fahad Hospital.


KSRelief dispatches help for Lebanese medical teams treating explosion victims 

Updated 05 August 2020

KSRelief dispatches help for Lebanese medical teams treating explosion victims 

RIYADH: The King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief) has assisted Lebanese medical teams treating victims of the Beirut explosion on Tuesday.

Emergency teams from the Souboul Al Salam Relief Team, which is funded by KSRelief, went from north of Lebanon to Beirut to support medical teams on the ground. 

Another team from Al-Amal Medical Center, also funded by KSRelief, provided emergency health care services and started a blood donation campaign to meet the demand of Beirut hospitals.

The prime minister of Lebanon, which is already struggling with an economic crisis and battling COVID-19, has made a desperate plea for help following Tuesday’s deadly explosions.
Kuwait said it has delivered medical aid and other essentials by a military plane on Wednesday morning.
The World Health Organization and the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies were sending 40 tonnes of medical supplies, including personal protective equipment to Beirut on a flight paid for by Dubai-based International Humanitarian City, a hub for humanitarian emergency preparedness and response, a WHO representative said.
"We are offering medical trauma kits and surgical kits containing things such as syringes, bandages and surgical gowns," said Nevien Attalla, operations manager for the WHO's Dubai hub.

*With agencies