For the first time, mothers in Saudi Arabia drive their own children to school 

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Professor Sharifah Al-Rajhi picks up her daughters Tolyn and Madleen from school on Sunday. (AN photo by Huda Bashatah)
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Professor Sharifah Al-Rajhi picks one of her daughters from school on Sunday. (AN photo by Huda Bashatah)
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Professor Sharifah Al-Rajhi picks one of her daughters from school on Sunday. (AN photo by Huda Bashatah)
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Professor Sharifah Al-Rajhi picks her daughters from school on Sunday. (AN photo by Huda Bashatah)
Updated 03 September 2018

For the first time, mothers in Saudi Arabia drive their own children to school 

  • A royal decree lifted the ban on women driving in the Kingdom effective June 24, 2-018.
  • More than 120,000 women have applied or expressed interest in obtaining a license so far

JEDDAH: Dr. Sharifah Al-Rajhi, a professor at King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, used to ask the family driver to take her children to school. 
Not anymore. When schools opened on Sunday, she herself did the driving, thanks to the Saudi government's decision to lift the ban on women driving.
Al-Rajhi says life has become much easier since she started driving her own car. As soon as the door was made open for women to apply for driving licenses on June 24, she said she immediately got her driver license. 
“It has helped me to become more independent. And today I drove my daughter Tolyn to school and we were happy to be able to do it like we used to do it in US,” she said on Sunday as schools opened. “Thank you King Salman for giving us the ability to drive in the KSA.”
The lifting of the ban on women driving in the Kingdom was a historic move that gained overwhelming support not only in the Kingdom but all over the word. 
More than 120,000 women have applied or expressed interest in obtaining a license so far.
The move is expected reduce the dependence of Saudi families on foreign drivers and also enable more women to seek employment.


Saudi rights body signs deal to launch programs for prisoners’ rights

Updated 30 November 2020

Saudi rights body signs deal to launch programs for prisoners’ rights

  • Al-Awwad said teams from the commission regularly visit prisons and detention facilities to ensure the rights of inmates are protected

RIYADH: Dr. Awwad Al-Awwad, president of the Human Rights Commission, on Monday said the Kingdom attaches great importance to the rights of prisoners and provides them with comprehensive care through various rehabilitation programs to help them integrate into society and become productive citizens.

He was speaking at the signing ceremony of three memorandums understanding (MoUs) with the National Committee for Prisoners, their Families, and Ex-Convicts (Tarahum) in Riyadh.

Al-Awwad said teams from the commission regularly visit prisons and detention facilities to ensure the rights of inmates are protected.

He said the commission works with the General Directorate of Prisons to promote prisoners’ rights in line with national regulations and international and regional agreements.

The agreement envisages the establishment of three centers.

The first center will be set up to support alternative punishments; the second center will be dedicated to visual communication between prisoners and their families; and the third will design and implement awareness programs.

Tarahum Secretary-General Turki bin Abdullah Al-Bati said the MoUs will help widen the scope of the committee, which seeks to work for the betterment of society in cooperation with relevant authorities.