Careem hits one million drivers across region in race with Uber

Careem has signed up its millionth driver. (Reuters)
Updated 03 September 2018

Careem hits one million drivers across region in race with Uber

  • Careem operates in 100 cities across 14 countries.
  • Ride hailing app expands across region

LONDON: Careem has passed the one million driver mark as it competes with global rival Uber in cities across the region.
The Dubai-based ride app, which operates in 14 countries mainly in the Middle East, said that Faisal Saleh from Hail in Saudi Arabia became the millionth person to sign up to the service.
The ride hailing app claims to be creating between 60,000 and 70,000 jobs per month in cities from Dubai to Casablanca amid fierce regional competition with global rival Uber.
“We are humbled about achieving our target of creating one million jobs in the region,” said Careem CEO Mudassir Sheikha. “We started Careem with a mission to simplify and improve the lives of people.”
Careem was founded in Dubai in 2012 by Sheikha and Magnus Olsson, two former McKinsey consultants. Abdulla Elyas became the third co-founder when Careem bought Jeddah-based address coding service Enwani two years later.
Uber and Careem were in preliminary talks to combine their Middle Eastern services, hoping to resolve a costly rivalry as Uber prepares for a public offering, Bloomberg reported on July 03, citing people familiar with the talks.
Saudi Arabia’s sovereign wealth fund is a major investor in Uber, after acquiring a $3.5 billion stake in the company in 2016. Meanwhile Kingdom Holding and Saudi Telecom venture capital unit STV are also investors in Careem.


White House says Trump regrets not raising tariffs higher

US President Donald Trump arrives at the G7 summit in Biarritz, France, on Sunday. Trump had been trying to use the conference to rally global leaders to do more to stimulate their economies, as fears rise of a potential slowdown in the US ahead of his reelection. (AP)
Updated 26 August 2019

White House says Trump regrets not raising tariffs higher

  • President’s comments appear at first to mark a rare moment of self-reflection by the US leader

TOKYO: President Donald Trump said Sunday that he had second thoughts about escalating the trade war with China, but the White House later reversed that message saying the president was misinterpreted and that his only regret in hiking tariffs is that he didn’t raise them higher. Trump faced a tense reception from world leaders meeting amid mounting anxiety of a global economic slowdown at the Group of Seven summit in France. During a breakfast meeting with British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, Trump suggested he had qualms about the spiraling conflict. “Yeah. For sure,” Trump told reporters when asked if he has second thoughts about escalating the dispute, adding he has “second thoughts about everything.”
But hours later, White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham issued a statement saying Trump’s comments about US tariffs on China were “greatly misinterpreted.”
She said Trump only responded “in the affirmative — because he regrets not raising the tariffs higher.” The comments appeared at first to mark a rare moment of self-reflection by the famously hard-nosed leader. But the later reversal fit a pattern for Trump in recoiling from statements he believes suggest weakness.

HIGHLIGHTS

• President Donald Trump faced a tense reception from world leaders meeting amid mounting anxiety of a global economic slowdown at the Group of Seven summit in France.

• White House said comments about US tariffs on China were ‘greatly misinterpreted.’

Trump had been trying to use the conference to rally global leaders to do more to stimulate their economies, as fears rise of a potential slowdown in the US ahead of his reelection. Trump’s counterparts, including Johnson, are trying to convince him to back off his trade wars with China and other countries, which they see as contributing to the economic weakening.

US-Japan agreement
Trump and Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe announced on Sunday a deal in principle on a major bilateral trade deal.
“It’s a very big transaction,” Trump said after talks with Abe on the sidelines of the G7 summit.
“Billions and billions of dollars,” he said. “It involves agriculture, it involves e-commerce. It involves many things. We’ve agreed in principle.”

Amazon fires
Also on Sunday, French President Emmanuel Macron said that world leaders at the G7 summit have agreed to help the countries affected by the huge wildfires ravaging the Amazon rainforest as soon as possible.
“We are all agreed on helping those countries which have been hit by the fires as fast as possible,” he told journalists.