What We Are Reading Today: Bit by Bit Social Research in the Digital Age

Updated 11 September 2018

What We Are Reading Today: Bit by Bit Social Research in the Digital Age

  • Bit by Bit is the key to unlocking these powerful methods

Author: Matthew J. Salganik

This book is an innovative and accessible guide to doing social research in the digital age.
In just the past several years, we have witnessed the birth and rapid spread of social media, mobile phones, and numerous other digital marvels.
In addition to changing how we live, these tools enable us to collect and process data about human behavior on a scale never before imaginable, offering entirely new approaches to core questions about social behavior.
Bit by Bit is the key to unlocking these powerful methods— a landmark book that will fundamentally change how the next generation of social scientists and data scientists explores the world around us. Bit by Bit is the essential guide to mastering the key principles of doing social research in this fast-evolving digital age. Matthew Salganik explains how the digital revolution is transforming how social scientists observe behavior, ask questions, run experiments, and engage in mass collaborations.


What We Are Reading Today: Saving America’s Cities by Lizabeth Cohen

Updated 6 min 39 sec ago

What We Are Reading Today: Saving America’s Cities by Lizabeth Cohen

  • Saving America’s Cities is a dramatic story of heartbreak and destruction but also of human idealism and resourcefulness

Saving America’s Cities is a thoroughly researched biography/history of Ed Logue, a prominent leader in urban renewal and redevelopment.

In Saving America’s Cities, the prizewinning historian Lizabeth Cohen follows the career of Logue, whose shifting approach to the urban crisis tracked the changing balance between government-funded public programs and private interests that would culminate in the neoliberal rush to privatize efforts to solve entrenched social problems. 

A review published in goodreads.com said Logue’s era of urban renewal “has a complicated legacy: Neighborhoods were demolished and residents dislocated, but there were also genuine successes and progressive goals. Saving America’s Cities is a dramatic story of heartbreak and destruction but also of human idealism and resourcefulness.” 

The review said that the book “is a good contrast for those who have read Robert Caro’s The Power Broker, his highly engaging and Pulitzer Prize winning biography of Robert Moses, sometimes called ‘the master builder’ of New York.”