Kim seeks second Trump summit ‘at an early date’: Moon

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North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, right, shakes hands with South Korean President Moon Jae-in before their summit at the headquarters of the Central Committee of the Workers’ Party in Pyongyang, North Korea, Tuesday, Sept. 18, 2018. (Pyongyang Press Corps Pool via AP)
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South Korean President Moon Jae-in, left, talks with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un at Okryu-Gwan restaurant in Pyongyang, North Korea, Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2018. (Pyongyang Press Corps Pool via AP)
Updated 20 September 2018

Kim seeks second Trump summit ‘at an early date’: Moon

  • Kim and Trump held a historic and high-profile meeting in Singapore in June, where the North’s leader committed to work toward denuclearization of the Korean peninsula, but no details were agreed.
  • Washington and Pyongyang have subsequently sparred over what that means and how it will be achieved.

SEOUL: North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is hoping for a second summit with US President Donald Trump soon, the South’s President Moon Jae-in said Thursday after a three-day trip to his neighbor.
“Chairman Kim Jong Un expressed hopes for a second summit with President Trump at an early date,” Moon told reporters on his return to Seoul.
Kim and Trump held a historic and high-profile meeting in Singapore in June, where the North’s leader committed to work toward denuclearization of the Korean peninsula, but no details were agreed.
Washington and Pyongyang have subsequently sparred over what that means and how it will be achieved, with the Trump administration consistently referring to the denuclearization of North Korea specifically.
The process had become deadlocked until Moon’s trip to Pyongyang, where Kim agreed to permanently dismantle a missile testing site.
Experts were skeptical but the Trump administration immediately welcomed the move, with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo inviting his North Korean counterpart to meet next week on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly.
Kim also hoped Pompeo would soon visit the North again, Moon said, and was seeking “fast progress in denuclearization.”


CIA officer killed in Somalia: US media

Updated 2 min 1 sec ago

CIA officer killed in Somalia: US media

  • The US has some 700 troops training Somali forces and carrying out raids against Al-Shabab militants
  • Al-Shabab, an Al-Qaeda affiliate, is estimated to have between 5,000 and 9,000 fighters
WASHINGTON: A CIA officer was killed in combat in Somalia in recent days, US media said Thursday without releasing details of how the agent died.
The veteran officer was a member of the CIA’s Special Activities Center, a paramilitary branch that carries out some of the US intelligence agency’s most dangerous tasks, The New York Times said.
The officer died of injuries sustained during an operation last week, according to CNN.
The CIA has not commented publicly on the death.
Washington has some 700 troops deployed in Somalia carrying out training of Somali forces and conducting counter-terrorism raids against the Al-Shabab militant group, which Washington designated a terrorist movement in 2008.
Earlier this month, Washington put on its terror blacklist the leader of an elite unit of the Al-Qaeda-affiliated group blamed for a January attack in Kenya that killed three Americans.
Al-Shabab is estimated to have between 5,000 and 9,000 fighters who have vowed to overthrow the Somali government, which is supported by some 20,000 troops from the African Union.
The slain US operative was a veteran of special forces operations, having previously been a member of the elite SEAL Team 6, the Times reported.
The outgoing administration of President Donald Trump is considering withdrawing all US forces from Somalia by the time he leaves office in January, the paper added.
At the start of his term, Trump gave the Pentagon a freer hand to expand their operations, with both air strikes and ground raids, in the war-ravaged African country.
But an official report released in February said that “despite continued US air strikes in Somalia and US assistance to African partner forces, Al-Shabab appears to be a growing threat that aspires to strike the US homeland.”