Saudia replaces Apple as top brand among KSA millennials 

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Millennials and non-millennials alike may have been won over by Saudia’s announcement earlier this month to introduce free-of-charge access to social messaging apps. (Courtesy Saudia)
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Updated 24 September 2018

Saudia replaces Apple as top brand among KSA millennials 

  • Facebook falls out of favour among Kingdom’s Youth, YouGov survey finds
  • Technology giant Apple fell to No. 3 in the top 10 brands this year

LONDON: The national airline Saudia has knocked Apple off the top spot as the brand Saudi millennials are most likely to talk about positively with their friends and family, according to a new survey.

Tech giant Apple fell to No. 3 in the top 10 brands this year, while social networking site Facebook failed to even rank at all, according to research compiled by YouGov.

Consumer electronics brand Samsung also saw its popularity decrease, dropping to eighth place this year. 

Brands that saw an improvement in their reputation included the Saudi fast-food chain Al Baik which came in at No. 6, while the real estate group Bin Laden and Saudi beverage brand Almarai made their debut in the top 10, ranking at spot nine and 10 respectively. 

Other drink brands including Aquafina, Fanta, Sprite and Diet Pepsi also saw improvements in their brand perception, the research found. 

The rankings are based on responses collected online from 18 to 34-year-olds over the last year to discover the brands they have discussed positively either in person or online. 

"The top 10 list has a mix of travel and airline brands, consumer brands, financial services and real estate brands. These brands have managed to harness the power of word of mouth and have been successful in shaping a positive brand image,” said Scott Booth, head of YouGov BrandIndex in the Middle East and North Africa. 

Millennials and non-millennials alike may have been won over by Saudia’s announcement earlier this month to introduce free-of-charge access to social messaging apps such as Facebook messenger, WhatsApp and iMessage for onboard guests. 

It is said to be the first airline in Europe, Middle East Africa and Asia to introduce complementary social media messaging on flights, according to a statement issued on Sept. 16.

 

 


Huawei in early talks with US firms to license 5G platform: executive

Updated 19 October 2019

Huawei in early talks with US firms to license 5G platform: executive

  • Currently there are no US 5G providers and European rivals Ericsson and Nokia are generally more expensive
  • Huawei has spent billions to develop its 5G technology since 2009

WASHINGTON: Blacklisted Chinese telecoms equipment giant Huawei is in early-stage talks with some US telecoms companies about licensing its 5G network technology to them, a Huawei executive told Reuters on Friday.
Vincent Pang, senior vice president and board director at the company said some firms had expressed interest in both a long-term deal or a one-off transfer, declining to name or quantify the companies.
“There are some companies talking to us, but it would take a long journey to really finalize everything,” Pang explained on a visit to Washington this week. “They have shown interest,” he added, saying conversations are only a couple of weeks old and not at a detailed level yet.
The US government, fearing Huawei equipment could be used to spy on customers, has led a campaign to convince allies to bar it from their 5G networks. Huawei has repeatedly denied the claim.
Currently there are no US 5G providers and European rivals Ericsson and Nokia are generally more expensive.
In May, Huawei, the world’s largest telecoms equipment provider, was placed on a US blacklist over national security concerns, banning it from buying American-made parts without a special license.
Washington also has brought criminal charges against the company, alleging bank fraud, violations of US sanctions against Iran, and theft of trade secrets, which Huawei denies.
Rules that were due out from the Commerce Department earlier this month are expected to effectively ban the company from the US telecoms supply chain.
The idea of a one-off fee in exchange for access to Huawei’s 5G patents, licenses, code and know-how was first floated by CEO and founder Ren Zhengfei in interviews with the New York Times and the Economist last month. But it was not previously clear whether there was any interest from US companies.
In an interview with Reuters last month, a State Department official expressed skepticism of Ren’s offer.
“It’s just not realistic that carriers would take on this equipment and then manage all of the software and hardware themselves,” the person said. “If there are software bugs that are built in to the initial software, there would be no way to necessarily tell that those are there and they could be activated at any point, even if the software code is turned over to the mobile operators,” the official added.
For his part, Pang declined to predict whether any deal might be signed. However, he warned that the research and development investment required by continuously improving the platform after a single-transfer from Huawei would be very costly for the companies.
Huawei has spent billions to develop its 5G technology since 2009.