Glencore launches $1 billion additional share buyback

Glencore said in July it would buy back shares worth up to $1 billion in a program of purchases running to the end of 2018. (AFP)
Updated 25 September 2018

Glencore launches $1 billion additional share buyback

  • Glencore said in July it would buy back shares worth up to $1 billion in a program of purchases running to the end of 2018
  • Many mining stocks have pared gains over the past few months as metals markets weakened

LONDON: Commodities trader and miner Glencore said on Tuesday it would repurchase more of its shares worth up to $1 billion, increasing the size of an existing buyback program that followed a subpoena from US authorities.
Glencore said in July it would buy back shares worth up to $1 billion in a program of purchases running to the end of 2018. It has now extended the program to the end of February 2019.
The London-listed miner, with a market capitalization of $61 billion, announced plans to repurchase shares after the US government investigation into bribery and corruption sent the stock down more than 15 percent since the start 2018.
Companies across the mining industry have been handing money back to shareholders after a recovery from the mining and commodity crash of 2015-16 and in response to pressure from investors not to spend cash on buying assets that they say may never deliver returns.
Global miner Rio Tinto said last week it will return $3.2 billion to shareholders from its sale of Australian coal assets in addition to existing buyback programs.
Glencore’s share price had already been hit by concerns about political risk in Democratic Republic of Congo, where it mines just over a quarter of the global output of cobalt, because of a mining code that was signed into law in June.
After publishing first-half results just below analyst forecasts in August, the company, which has aggressively slashed its debt since 2015, said it would favor share buybacks over deal-making.
Many mining stocks have pared gains over the past few months as metals markets weakened in response to global trade tensions and uncertainty about Chinese demand.


China's aviation regulator raised concerns with Boeing on 737 MAX design changes

Updated 12 December 2019

China's aviation regulator raised concerns with Boeing on 737 MAX design changes

  • China is reviewing the airworthiness of the plane
  • China was first country to ground plane in March

BEIJING: China’s aviation regulator raised “important concerns” with Boeing Co. on the reliability and security of design changes to the grounded 737 MAX, it said on Thursday, but declined to comment on when the plane might fly again in China.
China is reviewing the airworthiness of the plane based on proposed changes to software and flight control systems according to a bilateral agreement with the United States, Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC) spokesman Liu Luxu told reporters at a monthly briefing.
He reiterated that for the plane to resume flights in China, it needed to be re-certified, pilots needed comprehensive and effective training to restore confidence in the model and the causes of two crashes that killed 346 people needed to be investigated with effective measures put in place to prevent another one.
China was the first country to ground the 737 MAX after the second crash in Ethiopia in March and had set up a task force to review design changes to the aircraft that Boeing had submitted.
The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will not allow the 737 MAX to resume flying before the end of 2019, its chief, Steve Dickson, said on Wednesday.
Once the FAA approves the reintroduction into service, the 737 MAX can operate in the United States, but individual regulators could keep the planes grounded in other countries until they complete their own reviews.
“Due to the trade war, the jury is still out on when China would reintroduce the aircraft,” said Rob Morris, Global Head of Consultancy at Ascend by Cirium.
Chinese airlines had 97 737 MAX jets in operation before the global grounding, the most of any country, according to Cirium Fleets Analyzer.