Pakistani religious leader agrees to host Taliban peace talks

Pakistani religious leader agrees to host Taliban peace talks
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Jamaat-e-Islami (JI) chief Siraj ul Haq with the visiting Afghan scholars’ delegation in Islamabad. (JI photo)
Pakistani religious leader agrees to host Taliban peace talks
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Afghan Ulema delegation seeks mediation by Maulana Sami-ul-Haq between the Taliban and the Afghan government. The Afghan scholars met Sami-ul-Haq in Islamabad on Sunday. (Photo courtesy: Sami-ul-Haq's office)
Updated 03 October 2018

Pakistani religious leader agrees to host Taliban peace talks

Pakistani religious leader agrees to host Taliban peace talks
  • A seven-member Afghan delegation met Pakistan’s religious-politico leader, Maulana Sami-ul-haq, asking him to help to bring the Taliban to the dialogue table
  • Haq is the head cleric of the religious seminary where many Taliban leaders graduated from, and has agreed to host dialogue between Afghanistan and the Taliban for lasting regional peace

ISLAMABAD: Maulana Sami-ul-Haq, known as the father of the Afghan Taliban, says he has offered his religious school in Pakistan as a venue for possible talks between the Taliban and Afghan government-sponsored peace council and religious scholars to find a peaceful solution to the conflict in Afghanistan.

Afghan scholars, who were in Pakistan this week to meet Pakistani religious leaders about holding conferences of clerics in Islamabad and Kabul on the war in Afghanistan, met Sami-ul-Haq in Islamabad on Sunday.

Many Taliban leaders studied in Sami-ul-Haq’s religious school, “Darul Uloom Haqqania,” in the northwestern town of Akora Khattak, and he is believed to have a certain degree of influence over the Taliban. 

The seven-member Afghan delegation, comprising members of the High Peace Council and the ulema council, met Sami-ul-Haq, chief of his own faction of Jamiat ulema-e-Islam party, and sought his help in restoring peace in the war-ravaged country.

“The Taliban and the Afghan ulema should hold closed-doors meetings and I offer my madrassa Haqqania for their face-to-face talks. They should first sit, pave the way for removing mistrust and address each other’s concerns,” Haq told Arab News. 

He said that he had a two-and-half hour meeting with the Afghan clerics about this on Sunday.

“They sought my mediation with the Taliban and empowered me to make a decision. I told them that this is a complicated issue and foreign powers are involved and they will not accept this. But I assured them to convey their opinion to the Taliban and the Taliban’s response to them. I will make efforts to broker your meeting,” the JUI-S leader told the Afghan delegation.

Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid refrained from commenting when a query was posted about whether the Taliban would accept Sami’s mediatory role.

However, an Afghan religious scholar, who had previously held a position in the Taliban group, said that the Taliban did not have any contact with the JUI-S leader. 




Taliban statement on the scholars initiative for talks with the Taliban. (Photo courtesy: Sami-ul-Haq's office)

The Afghan embassy also refused to provide on-the-record comments about whether the Afghan side offered mediation to Sami-ul-Haq. However, a source close to the talks confirmed that the mediation was part of the discussion.

“Sami-ul-Haq told the delegation that the Taliban want an impartial mediator and our people then told him you should come forward and mediate,” the source told Arab News.

The Taliban wrote a letter to Pakistani scholars last week to stay away from the meeting and later issued a statement to dismiss the move as a “plan of the Americans to exert religious pressure on the Taliban.” The Urdu-language letter was made available to Arab News.

“The Islamic Emirate once again calls on all sincere and independent religious scholars of Afghanistan and Pakistan to boycott the said conferences and not become victims of American strategies and intelligence plots. Do not give a new meaning and concept to the Afghan Jihad after 17 years and do not lend indirect support for the American occupation,” the Taliban statement said on Sept. 29.

Experts believe that Haq is irrelevant as the Taliban have new fighters and the Taliban leaders have long been out of his religious seminary’s clout.

“Sami-ul-Haq may be helpful but logically he is irrelevant and pinning hopes on him is unrealistic,” Imtiaz Gul, head of the Islamabad-based think tank Center for Research and Security Studies (CRSS), told Arab News on Tuesday.

Afghan scholars held detailed discussions with Pakistan’s internationally recognized religious scholar Maulana Taqi Usmani, chief of Ansar ul Ummah Fazal ur Rehman Khalil, Maulana Iderees, Hanif Jhalandari and chairman of the Council of Islamic Ideology Dr. Qibla Ayaz.

Both sides did not issue any statement and refused to offer any official comment on their talks when Arab News approached them.

The Afghan delegates also had a breakfast meeting with Jamaat-e-Islami chief Siraj-ul-Haq in Islamabad on Monday and a statement issued by the Haq’s seminary said that the party leader backed intra-Afghan dialogue.

Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi, who traveled to Kabul last month, agreed with Afghan officials on a meeting of scholars and foreign ministry officials to discuss the agenda for a joint conference of the scholars to issue a joint decree on violence in Afghanistan.

Afghanistan has long been urging Pakistan to use religious scholars, who have influence on the Taliban, for peace in Afghanistan. However, Pakistani scholars had been reluctant to sit with the Afghan scholars in view of the Taliban opposition to such meetings. 




Taliban letter to the scholars in Pakistan arguing them not to mediate. (Photo courtesy: Sami-ul-Haq's office)

 


Jewish group condemns ‘pure antisemitism’ in German protests

Jewish group condemns ‘pure antisemitism’ in German protests
Updated 13 May 2021

Jewish group condemns ‘pure antisemitism’ in German protests

Jewish group condemns ‘pure antisemitism’ in German protests
  • German cities including Berlin, Hamburg and Hannover have seen anti-Israeli protests over the past few days
  • Two synagogues were attacked and several Israeli flags were torn down and burned since violence erupted in Israel and the Gaza Strip.

BERLIN: Germany’s leading Jewish group on Thursday sharply condemned protests in front of a synagogue in the western city of Gelsenkirchen as “pure antisemitism.”
Several other German cities including Berlin, Hamburg and Hannover have seen anti-Israeli protests over the past few days.
At least two synagogues were attacked, and several Israeli flags were torn down and burned since the latest eruption of violence in Israel and the Gaza Strip.
The Central Council of Jews in Germany tweeted a video of dozens of protesters in Gelsenkirchen waving Palestinian and Turkish flags and yelling expletives about Jews.
“Jew hatred in the middle of Gelsenkirchen in front of the synagogue. The times in which Jews were cursed in the middle of the street should have long been over. This is pure antisemitism, nothing else!” the group tweeted.
The German government repeatedly condemned anti-Israeli and antisemitic attacks earlier this week and said that “the perpetrators must be found and held responsible and Jewish institutions must be protected thoroughly.”
On Thursday, Foreign Minister Heiko Maas told Funke Media Group that “there must be zero tolerance for attacks on synagogues in our country.”
“All of us are called on to make it very clear that we do not accept if Jews in Germany are made responsible for the events in the Middle East — neither in the streets nor on social media,” Maas added.
The protests in Gelsenkirchen on Wednesday were dispersed by police, German news agency DPA reported, but authorities reported further incidents in other parts of the country.
Some cities which had hoisted Israeli flags in front of their city halls on Wednesday in remembrance of the start of German-Israeli diplomatic relations on May 12, 1965, reported that the flags were torn down and sometimes burned.
An Israeli flag in front of a city hall in the western town of Solingen was torn and burnt and two Israeli flags in Berlin were also torn down late Wednesday night.
On Tuesday night, police stopped 13 suspects in the western city of Muenster near a synagogue after an Israeli flag was burned there. In the western city of Bonn, police said several people damaged the entrance of a synagogue with stones and investigators found a burned flag as well. In nearby Duesseldorf, somebody burned garbage on top of a memorial for a former synagogue.
Several cities and states in Germany have since upped their security and raised police presence in front of Jewish institutions, dpa reported.
In Berlin, some 100 people also assembled for a pro-Israel rally on Wednesday night in front of the city’s landmark Brandenburg Gate waving Israeli flags and holding a banner saying “We stand with Israel — Now and Forever.”


Muslims across Italy celebrate Eid Al-Fitr

Muslims across Italy celebrate Eid Al-Fitr
Updated 13 May 2021

Muslims across Italy celebrate Eid Al-Fitr

Muslims across Italy celebrate Eid Al-Fitr
  • Members of the Islamic community in Palermo, which numbers around 20,000, joined early-morning prayers at the Foro Italico, a vast open-air area facing the sea
  • Stewards from the community made sure that social distancing was maintained, with Sicily still recording a high number of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) cases

ROME: Thousands of Muslims in Palermo gathered in the capital of Sicily’s waterfront to celebrate Eid Al-Fitr and pray for the victims in Palestine.

Several members of the Islamic community in Palermo, which counts around 20,000 members, joined early-morning prayers at the Foro Italico, a vast open-air area facing the sea.

Everyone was wearing a mask and carrying their own carpet. Stewards from the community made sure that social distancing was maintained, with Sicily still recording a high number of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) cases.

Prayers were led by Mustafà Boulaalam, the imam of the mosque of Piazza Gran Cancelliere, which before 1998 was a Catholic church and was donated to the Islamic community by the late Cardinal of Palermo Salvatore Pappalardo. Imams from the city’s other mosques and Islamic centers also joined this moment of reflection.

The Mayor of Palermo Leoluca Orlando represented the city, and gave his best wishes to the Islamic community.

Orlando said: “In this moment we are all called to build fraternity in order to create peace and feel that we are children of one God. Unfortunately, this fraternity we all long for continues to be mortified by the deaths in the Mediterranean of migrants who try to reach Europe from North Africa but also from the bombs and blood that in these hours are tearing Palestine apart.”

He added: “We must all fight to defend life and pursue fraternity between individuals and peoples in the wake of peace.”

The mayor told Arab News: “Even this year Eid Al-Fitr is a feast for the entire city of Palermo and all of its citizens, not only for the Muslims who live and work here.”

Fr. Piero Magro read a message of participation from the Palermo Archbishop Corrado Lorefice, who was represented at the prayer by Biagio Conte, a lay missionary who since the late 1990s has run the “Missione di Speranza e Carità,” a charity in one of the poorest neighborhoods of Palermo.

“In our mission we have every day hundreds of Muslim brothers coming to seek for help. We try to do whatever we can to help them, especially in this particularly difficult time of the pandemic. Because we are all brothers and only if we are together we will overcome the hardship,” Conte told Arab News.

In Rome, only 1,000 were admitted for prayers in the grounds of the Great Mosque in the north of the Italian capital. 

The Islamic Cultural Center advised those over 70 and children to not attend. The center ordered everyone to bring their own disinfected Sajjada and to practice ablutions at home before reaching the mosque.

“It is so nice to be here again, all together, to pray in respect of the precautions. This Ramadan has been more normal than the one we had last year, when the pandemic reached its peak. At least we can go to the Islamic centers, and now we can celebrate,” Hussein Garoub, 20, a student at the La Sapienza University in Rome, told Arab News after the prayer.


Protests over Glasgow immigration raid on Eid

Protests over Glasgow immigration raid on Eid
Updated 13 May 2021

Protests over Glasgow immigration raid on Eid

Protests over Glasgow immigration raid on Eid
  • 200 protesters in a largely Muslim part of Scotland's biggest city demonstrated as immigration officials raided a property on Eid al-Fitr’s first day
  • There was no immediate comment from the UK Home Office on who was targeted in the raid

GLASGOW: Around 200 protesters in a largely Muslim part of Scotland’s biggest city demonstrated as immigration officials raided a property on Thursday, the start of the festival of Eid Al-Fitr.
The raid occurred in the Glasgow constituency of Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon, who said she was “deeply concerned by this action by the Home Office, especially today in the heart of a community celebrating Eid.”
“My office is making urgent enquiries and stands ready to offer any necessary assistance to those detained,” she tweeted.
There was no immediate comment from the UK Home Office on who was targeted in the raid but Mohammad Asif, director of the Afghan Human Rights Foundation, indicated they were Afghans.
“The same people who run from the British and American bombs put at the back of the van right now. And they are about to be deported,” he said.
“And it’s on Eid you know... the guys are not even allowed to pray. How do you do that in a democratic society? It’s a sad day.”
Watched by a large deployment of police, protesters sat on the road in front of the property and a crowd gathered around the Home Office vehicle, chanting “Leave our neighbors, let them go” and “Cops go home.”
The three-day festival of Eid marks the end of the holy fasting month of Ramadan. It is traditionally celebrated with mosque prayers, family feasts and shopping.
“I’d ask Christians to reflect on what it would feel like to have your house raided on Christmas Day,” said Tom, a neighbor who joined the protest.


Afghan president says Pakistan will not support return of Taliban

Afghan president says Pakistan will not support return of Taliban
Updated 13 May 2021

Afghan president says Pakistan will not support return of Taliban

Afghan president says Pakistan will not support return of Taliban
  • Ghani’s remarks come days after the Pakistan army chief visits Kabul despite stalled negotiations
  • Ties between Kabul and Islamabad have been historically tense but have soured even more in the past 20 years

KABUL: Afghanistan President Ashraf Ghani said on Thursday that Pakistan, which Kabul has long seen as a supporter of the Taliban, is not in favor of the group’s return to power in his war-battered country.

Concerns are mounting among the current Afghan administration because the complete US troop withdrawal, expected by September, could leave the country vulnerable to a Taliban takeover 20 years after it was ousted from power in a US-led invasion.

Ghani’s remarks came days after a visit from Pakistan’s army chief, Gen. Qamar Javed Bajwa, to Kabul.

“Pakistan’s army, in utter clarity, announced that the revival of Islamic Emirate is not in Pakistan’s national interest,” Ghani said in a televised speech after Eid Al-Fitr prayers, marking the end of Ramadan.

The Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan was the country’s name during Taliban rule from 1996-2001.

“Afghanistan’s peace and stability means peace and stability in the region,” the president said, adding the Pakistani general expressed his support for “the republic” — which is understood as Ghani’s government.

The Pakistani military did not immediately comment on Ghani’s statement. Its spokesperson also was not available when contacted by Arab News.

Ties between Kabul and Islamabad have been historically tense but have soured even more in the past 20 years. The Afghan government accused Pakistan of backing the Taliban which has been fighting to drive foreign troops out of the country and return to power.

While Pakistan has denied supporting the Taliban, its influence has been crucial in persuading the militants to join ongoing US-sponsored negotiations for a permanent ceasefire and power-sharing arrangement in Afghanistan.

Gen. Bajwa’s visit to Kabul came as the negotiations have stalled for months and violent attacks in Afghanistan have been on the rise since the US missed a May 1 deadline to withdraw its soldiers under last year’s agreement between Washington and the Taliban.

“Pakistan is also not keen on seeing an extremist ideology taking root in Afghanistan. It represents a risk for the generals and Pakistan’s democracy as well,” Toreq Farhadi, a former adviser to the Afghan government, told Arab News.

“Pakistan wants a political settlement in Afghanistan where Taliban can be part of the governing structure and opposes a total takeover of power by the Taliban.”


Muslims around the world mark Eid al Fitr

Muslims around the world mark Eid al Fitr
Updated 13 May 2021

Muslims around the world mark Eid al Fitr

Muslims around the world mark Eid al Fitr
  • For the second year Muslims celebrations are being impacted by COVID-19 restictions
  • In Gaza Muslims marked Eid despite the escalating violence with Israel

DUBAI: Millions of Muslims around the world performed Eid Al-Fitr prayers on Thursday with varying degrees of restrictions imposed because of COVID-19 and civil unrest.

Eid Al-Fitr marks the end of the holy fasting month of Ramadan, when Muslims abstain from any form of food – liquid or solid – as well as not smoking during daylight hours.

There are some similarities in the way Muslims celebrate around the world, with prayers and where possible with family and friends.

In Ukraine, Eastern Europe, Muslims bake cakes, go on picnics and organize barbecues in forests.

In Gaza, Muslims still prayed together despite intense fighting with Israel.

 

 

And in China - where the government has been facing intense criticism for its treatment of minority Muslims - Beijing's Muslim community gathered for Eid al-Fitr prayers at the Niujie Mosque - the capital city's biggest and oldest mosque.

In Afghanistan a three-day ceasefire has been agreed by the warring Taliban and Afghan forces, which came into force on Thursday.

Indonesia – the world’s biggest Muslim majority nation – has for a second year been severely impacted by the coronavirus pandemic.  

 

 

Many mosques have had to be closed and restrictions on movements have impacted family reunions.

Even in non-Islamic countries, Muslims will attend local mosques to pray - but Thursday is normal working day and some will book the time off work to be with family - COVID–19 restrictions allowing.

For more images of Muslims welcoming Eid Al-Fitr click here.