Arab coalition spokesman: Houthi militia looting worsening Yemeni crisis

A member of the Houthi militia arranges money donated by Houthi supporters on September 27, 2016. (File/AFP)
Updated 09 October 2018

Arab coalition spokesman: Houthi militia looting worsening Yemeni crisis

  • Colonel Al-Maliki highlighted the ongoing looting by the Houthi militia as the main issue
  • He claimed it has already exceeded more than $5.2 billion

DUBAI: Colonel Turki Al-Maliki, spokesman for the Saudi-led Arab coalition, said that the Houthis were causing problems that were directly affecting the Yemeni economy, Saudi news channel Al-Ekhbariya reported on Monday.

Colonel Al-Maliki highlighted the ongoing looting by the Houthi militia as the worst these problems, which he claimed has already exceeded more than $5.2 billion. The Houthis have collected more than 800 billion Yemeni riyals worth of taxes in ports that they controlled, he added, during a press conference of the coalition forces supporting the internationally recognized government of Yemen, which was held at the Armed Forces Officers Club in Riyadh.

Al-Maliki said that the Houthi militia, backed by Iran, also stole a billion dollars from the General Organization for Insurance in Sanaa, and noted that all these hostilities by the Houthi militias were not of interest to the Yemeni people.

The Office of the Coordinator of Humanitarian Affairs and many governmental and non-governmental organizations have condemned the actions of the Houthi militias.

Al-Maliki also stated that Saudi Arabia’s continued efforts to support the Yemeni economy was proof of its credibility. According to Al-Maliki, the Kingdom has donated $1 billion in 2014, deposited at the Central Bank of Yemen, with another $2 billion donation made in January of 2018 aimed at supporting the Yemeni currency.

King Salman also provided $200 million to the Yemen central bank in support of its financial position.


Yemen government to begin first evacuation flights for stranded citizens 

Updated 28 May 2020

Yemen government to begin first evacuation flights for stranded citizens 

  • Yemenia flights will be sent to Egypt, Jordan and India in the first stage of the evacuation flights
  • After returning to Yemen, citizens will be sent to health centers for check-ups

Yemen’s internationally recognized government will begin the first evacuation flights for citizens who have been stranded abroad since the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic, state news agency SABA reported. 
The first evacuation flight will be sent to Jordan on Thursday, a meeting chaired by Prime Minister Maeen Abdulmalik Saeed with Yemen’s Supreme National Emergency Committee for COVID-19 heard. 
This came after the committee approved the protocol for evacuating citizens stranded abroad, which includes procedures and timetables for scheduling the return of citizens to Yemen, and organizing specific health and precautionary controls and procedures, the news agency said. 
The authorities are tasked with the rapid implementation of precautionary measures in preparation for the returning citizens. 

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Yemenia flights will be sent to Egypt, Jordan and India in the first stage of the evacuation flights. Yemeni nationals will be tested prior to travel and will receive a health certificate from an accredited medical center.
After returning to Yemen, citizens will be sent to health centers for check-ups, treatment and to keep track of their data. Returning nationals will also be required to self-quarantine at home.  
Stranded nationals will be informed of flight times immediately after the necessary permits with the countries in which they are in are completed, the committee said. 
The Minister of Public Health and head of the committee, Dr Nasser Baoum, and Deputy Prime Minister Salem Al-Khanbashi presented a report on the development of the situation in Aden. The report discussed the establishment of a medical unit for the treatment and reception of cases of coronavirus infection. 
The committee also reviewed the report submitted by the Secretary-General of the Council of Ministers, Hussein Mansour, on those stranded in Saudi Arabia and discussed measures for their return. Mansour said discussions were in place with Saudi official to schedule their return.
In Yemen, scores of COVID-19 cases have been recorded across the country, but the UN warns that the virus is spreading largely undetected. Hundreds of people in the interim capital Aden have died in the past week with symptoms of what appears to be the coronavirus, local health officials said.
The officials fear the situation is only going to get worse as Yemen has little capacity to treat those suspected of having the virus.