Tasmeem Fair gives Saudi designers a chance to shine

An artwork on show by Ahmed Jeddawi, architect and calligrapher, in the second edition of Tasmeem Fair in Jeddah. (Photo/Supplied)
Updated 14 October 2018

Tasmeem Fair gives Saudi designers a chance to shine

  • The exhibition was a big success last year
  • Arab News was given special exclusive access to the venue before opening night

JEDDAH: Tasmeem, a nonprofit initiative by the Saudi Art Council, is opening in Jeddah tonight in its second edition. The initiative serves as a platform for interior designers and architects to present their work in a different light, reinforcing their role in Saudi society.

Under the patronage of Princess Jawaher bin Majed bin Abdul Aziz, Tasmeem’s selection of the best and most innovative designers this year grasped the mysterious concept curated by Lama bin Mansour. 

Arab News was given special exclusive access to the venue before opening night. An aura of mystery surrounds the venue but its buzz for excitement can be felt around you.

The initiative’s first exhibit last year was regarded as a success by many, presenting architects and interior designers in a new light, allowing them to develop their displays, resulting in innovative and unexpected creations. Visitors can flow from one hall to the next, admiring the installations and experience some of them firsthand. From a first look, it seems that this year will be equally successful, if not better.

This year’s mysterious concept is one that can resonate with many, with several keynote speakers presenting a number of topics ranging from calligraphy and architecture, architectural photography and more. Workshops and lectures will accompany the exhibition for the duration of the fair. 

Tasmeem Fair is open to all on Oct. 11-22 in SAC’s Gold Moor headquarters in the Shatea district.


Houthi attack on Saudi Aramco facilities act of terror: Japanese defense minister

Updated 40 min 43 sec ago

Houthi attack on Saudi Aramco facilities act of terror: Japanese defense minister

TOKYO: Taro Kono, the defense minister of Japan, said that threats to his country’s oil supply was the “most worrying scenario” he could imagine in international relations, in the wake of attacks on Saudi Arabian oil production facilities. 

“The most pessimistic scenario right now is that something happens in the Straits of Hormuz and the oil supply gets cut down, and that would send a shock wave through the global economy. I think the price of oil is already rising after this attack on Saudi facilities, so that’s the most worrying scenario right now,” he told a conference in Tokyo, Japan.

However, speaking on the sidelines to Arab News, he insisted that Saudi Arabia would remain a reliable partner of Japan - which imports around 40 per cent of its crude from the Kingdom - and downplayed concerns about long-term supply problems.

“Saudi has been and will be an important source of our energy supply. We have international co-ordination, and we have reserves, so we are not really worried about that,” he said. 

Kono, who was until recently Japan’s foreign minister, said that his country would be seeking to promote diplomatic solutions to the latest Middle East conflagration. "We definitely need to ease the tension between those countries. As Foreign Minister, the last thing I was doing was calling the Iranian Foreign Minister and the French Foreign Minister to ease the tension the region through diplomatic actions, and I think it's important to continue doing it.

“This Houthi attack on Saudi is a little different, because it's a terrorist attack. I think we may require some kind of military operation against those drone attacks, and that's something out of Japan's constitutional boundary. I think Japan will be focusing on diplomatic efforts in easing tension in the region.”

He raised concerns about the apparent lack of sophistication in the recent attacks. “If it is really drones, that is a lot cheaper than any form of conventional missile,” he said.