Ecuador tells Assange to curb speech, look after cat

Julian Assange has reportedly been instructed to keep the Ecuadorean embassy clean and threatened with the confiscation of his pet cat if he does not look after it. (AP Photo)
Updated 15 October 2018

Ecuador tells Assange to curb speech, look after cat

  • Ecuador has formally ordered WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange to steer clear of topics that could harm its diplomatic interests
  • Assange has been living at the embassy since 2012, when the Australian ex-hacker applied for asylum

LONDON: A media report says that Ecuador has formally ordered WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange to steer clear of topics that could harm its diplomatic interests.
The nine-page memo published Monday by the Ecuadorean website Codigo Vidrio says Assange is prohibited from “interfering in the internal affairs of other states.”
The document also orders Assange to keep the embassy clean, threatening to confiscate Assange’s pet cat if he does not look after it.
The Associated Press could not immediately authenticate the document, but Codigo Vidrio has a track record of publishing inside material from within the London embassy. Messages left with Ecuador’s Foreign Ministry and WikiLeaks representatives were not immediately returned.
Assange has been living at the embassy since 2012, when the Australian ex-hacker applied for asylum to avoid extradition to Sweden.


Sheep take over streets of Madrid for annual migration

Updated 20 October 2019

Sheep take over streets of Madrid for annual migration

  • The annual event, which started in 1994, allows shepherds to exercise their right to use traditional routes to migrate their livestock
  • The herd includes 2,000 merino sheep and 100 goats

MADRID: Sheep replaced traffic on the streets of Madrid on Sunday as shepherds steered their flocks through the heart of the Spanish capital, following ancient migration routes.
The annual event, which started in 1994, allows shepherds to exercise their right to use traditional routes to migrate their livestock from northern Spain to more southerly pastures for winter grazing.
The route would have taken them through undeveloped countryside a few centuries ago, but today it cuts through Madrid’s bustling city center and along some of its most famous streets.
Sheep farmers pay a nominal charge in symbolic acknowledgement of a 1418 agreement with the city council that set a fee of 50 maravedis — medieval coins — per 1,000 sheep brought through the central Sol square and Gran Via street.
The herd includes 2,000 merino sheep and 100 goats.