Two rhinos die in Chad after being relocated from S.Africa

1 / 2
This file photo taken on May 4, 2018 shows a black rhino running around in a holding pen in Zakouma National Park. (AFP)
2 / 2
This file photo taken on May 4, 2018 shows a black rhino standing in a transport crate on arrival at Zakouma National Park. (AFP)
Updated 21 October 2018

Two rhinos die in Chad after being relocated from S.Africa

JOHANNESBURG: Two of six critically endangered black rhinos have died of unknown causes five months after being flown from South Africa to Chad in a pioneering project to re-introduce the animals, officials said Sunday.
Rhinos in Chad were wiped out by poaching nearly 50 years ago, and the six rhinos were intended to establish a new population in the country after intensive anti-poaching measures were put in place to protect them.
“We can confirm that these two rhinos (a male and a female) were not poached,” the South African environment department and Chad government said in a joint statement. “However, the exact cause of death is not yet known.”
In July, there was widespread outrage and a bitter row over responsibility when 11 black rhinos in Kenya died after being transferred to a new sanctuary, mainly due to toxic levels of salt in borehole drinking water.
The rhinos in Chad had been roaming free in Zakouma National Park since late August after a gradual acclimatization process that saw them first released into small enclosures.
The carcasses of the cow and bull were discovered on October 15.
The surviving four rhinos are being closely monitored, the statement said, adding that a specialist veterinarian had traveled to the park to conduct postmortems.
It said the cause of death would be announced as soon as possible.
In May, the six rhinos were sedated with darts, put in special ventilated steel crates and driven under police escort from Addo park in South Africa to Port Elizabeth airport.
They were then flown to Chad on a 3,000-mile (4,800-kilometer) flight, accompanied by a team of vets checking their stress levels.
The high-profile transfer, which took two years of planning, was hailed as major conservation breakthrough, with translocation organizer African Parks describing it as a “truly hopeful story.”
There are fewer than 25,000 rhinos left in the wild in Africa due to a surge in poaching, and only 5,000 of them are black rhinos.
Black rhinos are rated as critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.
Rhinos are targeted to feed a booming demand for rhino horn in China, Vietnam and other Asian countries, where it is believed to have medicinal qualities.
Northern white rhinos disappeared from Chad several decades ago and the last western black rhino was recorded there in 1972, after decades of poaching pushed both subspecies to local extinction.
Rhinos were re-introduced to Rwanda in 2017.


Judge lifts ban on ‘tell-all’ book by Donald Trump’s niece

Updated 02 July 2020

Judge lifts ban on ‘tell-all’ book by Donald Trump’s niece

  • Mary Trump dubs the US president ‘the world’s most dangerous man’
  • The president’s brother Robert Trump had asked for the restraining order

WASHINGTON: An appeals court judge in New York has lifted a temporary ban on the publication of a potentially explosive “tell-all” book by President Donald Trump’s niece, court documents showed.
The ruling issued Wednesday allows publisher Simon & Schuster to print and distribute the 240-page book by Mary Trump, who dubs the US president “the world’s most dangerous man.”
It would be the latest bombshell memoir to dish dirt on the leader after former aide John Bolton’s book, which described Trump as corrupt and incompetent, was cleared for publication last week.
The president’s brother Robert Trump had asked for the restraining order, arguing that Mary was violating a non-disclosure agreement signed in 2001 after the settlement over the estate of Fred Trump — the father of Donald and Robert and of Mary’s father Fred Trump Jr.
Judge Alan Scheinkman postponed addressing whether the author had violated the agreement preventing her from revealing family secrets by writing the book, titled “Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man.”
Nevertheless Simon & Schuster “is not a party to the agreement,” so the block of their publication of the book “is vacated,” he ruled.
In the book, Mary, a clinical psychologist, recounts what she witnessed of the “toxic family” in the home of her grandparents, according to her publisher.
“According to the plaintiff, Ms. Trump has stated that (the) book contains an ‘insider’s perspective’ of ‘countless holiday meals,’ ‘family interactions,’ and ‘family events,’” Scheinkman’s ruling said.
The Daily Beast has reported the book will reveal that Mary Trump was the crucial source for explosive New York Times reporting on Trump’s finances, which suggested the billionaire paid little in tax for decades.
In a statement, Mary Trump’s attorney Ted Boutrous said the lifting of the prior restraint against the publisher was “very good news.”
“We look forward to filing our brief tomorrow (Thursday) in the trial court explaining why the same result is required as to Ms. Trump, based on the First Amendment and basic contract law,” he said.
Mary Trump’s legal team said they were hoping for a July 10 hearing, which will most likely take place virtually.
Last week a judge refused to block the release of Bolton’s book, titled “The Room Where It Happened,” saying it was too late for the restraining order sought by the Trump administration.
Trump has characterized the portrait of 17 months up close with the leader, until Bolton was fired in September, as “fiction.”
Other books written about the president include journalist Michael Wolff’s “Fire and Fury,” a behind-the-scenes account of Trump’s chaotic early days in the White House, which sold more than four million copies worldwide.
Trump dismissed that book as “full of lies.”