The fifth annual Abu Dhabi Strategic Debate kicks off in UAE capital

 The fifth Abu Dhabi Strategic Debate (ADSD) kicked off in the UAE capital on Sunday with opening remarks given by the country’s Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Dr Anwar Al Gargash. (AN Photo)
Updated 11 November 2018

The fifth annual Abu Dhabi Strategic Debate kicks off in UAE capital

  • The two-day fifth Abu Dhabi Stategic Debate focuses on international politics and an in-depth look at the Arab world as a "a region of turmoil and unprecedented transformation”
  • ADSD, was created by the Abu Dhabi-based think tank, the Emirates Policy Center, will focus on International politics and establishing how to better understand and predict future shifts

ABU DHABI: The fifth Abu Dhabi Strategic Debate (ADSD) kicked off in the UAE capital on Sunday with opening remarks given by the country’s Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Dr Anwar Al Gargash.

Gargash praised US President Donald Trump for America’s new sanctions imposed on Iran and condemned the country’s “menacing” actions in the region.

“The softer approach has failed,” Gargash said as he called for stronger action by allies in the Western world against Iran and its role as the “primary force of instability in the region.”

He also praised Saudi Arabia as a key player in enhancing military and diplomatic capabilities to fight extremism and instability in the GCC.

“The UAE is preparing itself for the future - for what comes after oil. That is why we are investing in knowledge, technology and education” Dr. Ebtesam Al Ketbi, President of the Emirates Policy Center said.

The two-day fifth Abu Dhabi Stategic Debate focuses on international politics and an in-depth look at the Arab world as a "a region of turmoil and unprecedented transformation.”

ADSD, was created by the Abu Dhabi-based think tank, the Emirates Policy Center, will focus on International politics and establishing how to better understand and predict future shifts, with the Emirates power building model being the first issue to address.

The conference will also include sessions on several countries’ policies, including US, Russia, and Europe, while also delving into situations within the Arab World such as Iran and Qatar. The event will allow prominent policy-makers, experts and officials to voice their opinions and thoughts as well as exchange ideas on these regional and international issues.  

Speakers at the debate include Former Arab League Secretary-General Amr Moussa, Former Yemeni Vice President and Prime Minister Khaled Bahah and President and CEO of International Crisis Group Robert Malley


Israeli PM: Palestinians in Jordan Valley won’t be citizens

Updated 25 min 42 sec ago

Israeli PM: Palestinians in Jordan Valley won’t be citizens

  • Netanyahu has vowed to press ahead with plans to annex the Jordan Valley

JERUSALEM: Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said on Thursday that Palestinians living in the Jordan Valley will remain in what he described as an “enclave” after Israel annexes the territory and will not be granted Israeli citizenship.
Netanyahu has vowed to press ahead with plans to annex the Jordan Valley and Jewish settlements in the occupied West Bank, in line with President Donald Trump’s Middle East plan, a process that could begin as early as July 1.
The annexation of the Jordan Valley and the far-flung settlements would make it virtually impossible to create a viable Palestinian state alongside Israel, which is still widely seen as the only way to resolve the decades-old conflict.
In an interview with the Israel Hayom newspaper, Netanyahu said Palestinians in the Jordan Valley, including residents of the city of Jericho, would remain under limited Palestinian self-rule, with Israel having overall security control.
“They will remain a Palestinian enclave,” he said. “You’re not annexing Jericho. There’s a cluster or two. You don’t need to apply sovereignty over them. They will remain Palestinian subjects, if you will. But security control also applies to these places.”
Palestinians in the West Bank have lived under Israeli military rule since the 1967 war, when Israel captured the territory, along with east Jerusalem and Gaza. The Palestinians want all three territories to form their future state.
The Trump plan would grant the Palestinians limited statehood over scattered enclaves surrounded by Israel if they meet a long list of conditions. Israel has embraced the plan, while the Palestinian Authority, which administers parts of the West Bank, has angrily rejected it and cut ties with the US and Israel.
Netanyahu said that if the Palestinians accept all the conditions in the plan, including Israel maintaining overall security control, “then they will have an entity of their own that President Trump defines as a state.”
Under a coalition agreement reached last month, Netanyahu can bring his annexation plans before the government as early as July 1.
The Palestinian Authority has said it is no longer bound by any agreements signed with Israel and the US, and says it has cut off security coordination with Israel. Neighboring Jordan, a close Western ally and one of only two Arab states to have made peace with Israel, has warned of a “massive conflict” if Israel proceeds with annexation.