Gunmen kill nine in Iraq’s Anbar province -security sources

Gunmen kill nine in Iraq’s Anbar province -security sources
Iraqi Shiite fighters of the Hashed al-Shaabi paramilitary force secure the border in al-Qaim in the Anbar province, opposite Albu Kamal in Syria's Deir Ezzor region on November 12, 2018. (AFP)
Updated 13 November 2018

Gunmen kill nine in Iraq’s Anbar province -security sources

Gunmen kill nine in Iraq’s Anbar province -security sources
  • Iraq declared victory over Daesh in December 2017 but security officials say the militants are likely to wage an insurgency after they were dislodged from all the territory they held

FALLUJA, Iraq: At least nine people were killed in Iraq’s Anbar province on Monday when gunmen attacked the home of a Sunni tribal militia officer, security sources said.
Captain Misha’an Hazemawi and eight other people were killed when gunmen stormed Hazemawi’s house near the Karma district, some 16 km (10 miles) northeast of Falluja.
No group has claimed responsibility for the attack but two security sources said Daesh militants were behind it.
A small number of militants are still operating in the area and are capable of launching sporadic attacks, Iraqi security officials say.
The officer was a member of the Tribal Mobilization Forces, a network of Sunni militias that backed the government in its fight against Daesh, the security sources said.
Daesh, which had seized control of much of northern Iraq in 2014, lost most of Anbar province to US-backed Iraqi security forces supported by Sunni tribal fighters in 2016.
Iraq declared victory over Daesh in December 2017 but security officials say the militants are likely to wage an insurgency after they were dislodged from all the territory they held.
Its fighters have kept up a campaign of kidnap and killing, mainly in the provinces of Kirkuk, Diyala and Salahuddin. 


Lebanon indicts 8 retired military figures over alleged graft

Updated 21 min 30 sec ago

Lebanon indicts 8 retired military figures over alleged graft

Lebanon indicts 8 retired military figures over alleged graft
  • Those accused of graft include former army chief Jean Kahwaji, who held the post from 2008 to 2017, and several former military intelligence chiefs
  • The under-fire ruling class has repeatedly pledged to root out graft, and this year the parliament passed a new law to combat ‘illicit enrichment’

BEIRUT: A Lebanese prosecutor Wednesday indicted eight retired military figures including a former army chief over “illicit enrichment,” a judicial source said, in a first under a new anti-graft law.
Popular anger has grown in the past year over alleged corruption among the political elite in Lebanon, where a dire economic crisis has pushed the poverty rate up to more than half the population.
Since mass protests erupted in October 2019, the under-fire ruling class has repeatedly pledged to root out graft, and this year the parliament passed a new law to combat illicit enrichment.
But critics have expressed little trust in a system they say is riddled with nepotism.
Those accused of graft on Wednesday included former army chief Jean Kahwaji, who held the post from 2008 to 2017, and several former military intelligence chiefs, the judicial source said.
The Beirut state prosecutor launched proceedings over their alleged “illicit enrichment, and using their official positions to reap vast wealth,” the source said.
A preliminary investigation showed a lack of correlation between their wealth and their income, the source said, adding that they would be questioned on December 10.
The official National News Agency said it was the first time such indictments were made since the law was passed.
It also made mention of a bank that several years ago had allegedly allowed Kahwaji and members of his family to deposit sums of up to $1.2 million in their accounts, without justification as to the origin of the funds.