BTS’s agency apologizes over K-Pop band member’s A-bomb shirt

A man holds leaflets denouncing South Korean boy band BTS outside Tokyo Dome where the band’s concert is planned to be held, in Tokyo on Tuesday, November 13. (Reuters)
Updated 14 November 2018

BTS’s agency apologizes over K-Pop band member’s A-bomb shirt

SEOUL, South Korea: The agency for K-pop superstars BTS apologized Wednesday for members wearing a T-shirt depicting the explosion of an atomic bomb and a hat with a Nazi emblem.

Japanese TV broadcasters recently canceled planned appearances in that country after images went viral of the musician wearing the shirt. The South Korean band ran into more trouble after news surfaced that another member wore a hat featuring a Nazi symbol in a magazine photo book and band members flew flags with what appeared to be the Nazi swastika during a past concert.

“We would like to again offer our sincerest apologies to anyone who has suffered pain, distress and discomfort due to our shortcomings and oversight in ensuring that these matters receive our most careful attention,” the band’s agency, the Big Hit Entertainment, said in a statement

The T-shirt portrayed an atomic bombing juxtaposed with the celebration of Korea’s 1945 liberation from Japan at the end of the World War II. The United States dropped atomic bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki before Tokyo’s surrender.

Before its division into North and South Korea after the liberation, the Korean Peninsula was colonized by Japan from 1910-1945. Many in both Koreas still harbor strong resentment against the Japanese colonial masters. But in South Korea, it’s extremely rare for anyone to publicly celebrate or mock the atomic bombings.

BTS’s agency said the A-bomb shirt’s wearing was “in no way intentional” and that it wasn’t designed to “injure or make light of those affected by the use of atomic weapons.” It said it still apologizes for “failing to take the precautions that could have prevented the wearing of such clothing by our artist.”

Regarding the hat furor, it said all apparel and accessories used for the photo book were provided by a media company involved in its publication. It said the flags in question were aimed at symbolizing South Korea’s restrictively uniform and authoritarian educational systems, not Nazism.

“We will carefully examine and review not only these issues but all activities involving Big Hit and our artists based on a firm understanding of diverse social, historical and cultural considerations to ensure that we never cause any injury, pain or distress to anyone,” the agency statement said.

The seven-member band, which has worldwide following, was the first South Korean artists in May to top the Billboard 200 albums chart with “Love Yourself: Tear.” The band began its Japan tour earlier this week.

South Korean K-pop and movie stars are extremely popular in Japan and other Asian countries.


Lolo Zouai reconnects with Algerian roots in new music video

Lolo Zouai unveiled her newest music video this week. (Instagram)
Updated 25 January 2020

Lolo Zouai reconnects with Algerian roots in new music video

  • The new video for singer Lolo Zouai’s “Desert Rose” is here
  • Filmed in Morocco, the clip is a celebration of Zouai’s North African roots

DUBAI: The new video for singer Lolo Zouai’s “Desert Rose” is here and it’s a beautiful celebration of her North African roots.

The Franco-Algerian singer, who was born Laureen Zouai in France to a French mother and an Algerian father and relocated to San Francisco with her family when she was three-months-old, wrote the song as a love letter to her Algerian family.

Zouai (pronounced “zoo-eye”) has been vocal about her period of internal struggle during which she felt she wasn’t as in touch with her Algerian heritage as she would have liked. These feelings informed her fourth single, whose title alludes to the rose-like crystal formations that occur in the desert of Algeria, and further plays on her existing feelings of not belonging.

Filmed in an unnamed village situated in Morocco’s Essaouira, the Emilie Badenhorst-directed clip further captures the 24-year-old’s feelings of displacement and desperate longing to reconnect with her father’s side of the family’s culture and traditions.

In the video, the singer croons “‘Inshallah,’ that’s what you say/ You think I lost my faith,” as she fraternizes with local children, watches a group of elders make couscous and traverses the sea in a boat all while wearing a mix of Western clothing and traditional Berber accessories.  

“I’m so grateful I was able to travel to North Africa to tell my story. To be honest, I was really scared to share this part of my life, but hopefully you guys understand me a little better now,” she shared with her 223,000 Instagram followers, alongside a wilted rose emoji.

“Desert Rose” is from her debut studio album entitled “High Highs to Low Lows” that dropped in 2019. Since its release, the project has amassed more than 50 million streams worldwide. In addition to the success of her own LP, the singer was also recognized for her song-writing skills in 2019 when she took home her first Grammy award for co-writing “Still Down” from H.E.R.’s self-titled album, which took home the R&B Album of the Year award at the Grammys that same year.

As of now, the Brooklyn-based singer is set to open up for British crooner Dua Lipa’s “Future Nostalgia” European tour in 2020.

The new music video will be screened all week at Time’s Square and Madison Square Garden in New York as well as The Staples Center in Los Angeles.