Iraq’s president to visit Saudi Arabia as part of regional tour

Iraq’s president to visit Saudi Arabia as part of regional tour
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Iraq's President Barham Salih and Jordan's King Abdullah review an honor guard at Amman military airport, Jordan, November 15, 2018. (Reuters)
Iraq’s president to visit Saudi Arabia as part of regional tour
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Abu Dhabi's Crown Prince Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed al-Nahyan meets with Iraq's President Barham Salih during his visit in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, November 12, 2018. (Reuters)
Iraq’s president to visit Saudi Arabia as part of regional tour
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Kuwaiti Emir Sheikh Sabah al-Ahmad al-Jaber al-Sabah receives Iraq's President Barham Salih during his visit in Kuwait, November 11, 2018. (Reuters)
Updated 16 November 2018

Iraq’s president to visit Saudi Arabia as part of regional tour

Iraq’s president to visit Saudi Arabia as part of regional tour
  • Salih visited the UAE on Monday and Kuwait on Sunday
  • The Iraqi president visited Jordan on Thursday where he met King Abdullah II of Jordan

JEDDAH: Iraq’s President Barham Salih will visit Saudi Arabia as part of a regional tour that will also include a visit to Iran on Saturday.
The Iraqi president visited Jordan on Thursday where he met King Abdullah II of Jordan. The two leaders discussed projects in the fields of energy, the extension of an oil pipeline between the two countries, and supplying electricity to Iraq.
“The governments of Iraq and Jordan will promote economic cooperation: the joint industrial city, energy cooperation, the oil pipeline from Basra to Aqaba,” Salih tweeted.
Salih also visited the UAE on Monday and Kuwait on Sunday.
On Saturday the Kurdish president will meet Hassan Rouhani in Tehran and a number of Iranian leaders and officials to discuss bilateral relations, ways to increase cooperation, and developments in the region, the Iraq state news agency said.
The veteran politician was elected last month as Iraq attempted to form a government after months of deadlock since elections in May.
His meetings in Iran will be dominated by a number of pressing political, economic and security issues.
The election left Iraq’s main political forces divided into pro and anti Iran factions. Many in Iraq have become critical of Iran’s heavy-handed influence in the country and its funding of powerful armed factions.
Because of its economic ties with Iran, Iraq has also been put in a difficult position by fresh US sanctions against Tehran.
Last week, the US said Iraq could continue to import natural gas and energy supplies from Iran for a period of 45 days, after reimposing sanctions on Tehran’s oil sector.
Iraq’s central bank said in August that Baghdad would ask Washington for exemptions from some of the sanctions.