DP World signs solar deal with ‘green champion’ SirajPower

DP World’s solar power initiative will generate energy for 4,600 homes in Dubai. (Shutterstock)
Updated 21 November 2018

DP World signs solar deal with ‘green champion’ SirajPower

  • The 22-year lease agreement announced on Tuesday will see UAE-based SirajPower initially deliver 15MW-worth of panels to Jafza
  • The deal forms part of DP World’s solar program which aims to ramp up use of sustainable and environmentally friendly energy sources across its facilities

LONDON: Global ports operator DP World has signed a deal with UAE-based SirajPower to install solar roof panels at its facilities in the Jebel Ali Freezone (Jafza) and National Industries Park as part the company’s efforts to reduce its energy consumption and cut costs.
The 22-year lease agreement announced on Tuesday will see UAE-based SirajPower initially deliver 15MW-worth of panels to Jafza.
The deal forms part of DP World’s solar program which aims to ramp up use of sustainable and environmentally friendly energy sources across its facilities. It follows the launch of the UAE’s first green storage and warehouse facilities at Jafza in June this year, with some cool storage facilities now entirely run on solar energy while other warehouses are becoming more energy efficient.
In late 2016, DP World announced the start of the construction of the largest solar rooftop project in the Middle East, with the commissioning of 88,000 rooftop solar panels across its Dubai facilities.
“Creating a sustainable business model through the implementation of green technologies is a core focus for DP World, and one of our key initiatives is our ground-breaking solar power program that will generate enough energy to power 4,600 homes on completion,” said Mohammed Al-Muallem, CEO and managing director, DP World, UAE region.
DP World has reduced its CO2 emissions intensity by 24 percent since 2008, Muallem added, in a statement on Tuesday.
SirajPower hopes the DP World deal as a springboard for regional growth, said Laurent Longuet, the company’s CEO.
“We witnessed a rapid growth in only three years and our plan now is to expand our offering to other emirates and countries in the GCC, as well as making a foray into the residential market to truly become the regional green champion,” he said.
SirajPower said it would open a branch in Jafza to support the installation of the new units. Construction is expected to take 18 months, the company said.
In 2015, Dubai Electricity and Water Authority (Dewa) launched the Shams Dubai solar initiative aimed at encouraging individuals and businesses to install PV panels to generate electricity and connect them to the Dewa network. The program supports government targets for Dubai to generate 25 percent of its energy needs from solar by 2030.
SirajPower has won contracts for 50MW-worth of the solar rooftop projects implemented under the Shams program to date.


$8bn blow to Erdogan as investors flee Turkey

Updated 09 July 2020

$8bn blow to Erdogan as investors flee Turkey

  • Overseas holdings in Istanbul stock exchange are at lowest in 16 years

ANKARA: Foreign capital is flooding out of Turkey in a massive vote of no confidence in President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s economic competence.
Overseas investors have withdrawn nearly $8 billion from Turkish stocks since January, according to Central Bank statistics, reducing foreign investment in the Istanbul stock exchange from $32.3 billion to $24.4 billion.
As recently as 2013, the figure was $82 billion, and foreign investors now own less than 50 percent of stocks for the first time in 16 years.
“Foreign investment has left Turkey for several reasons, both internal and external,” Win Thin, global head of currency strategy at Brown Brothers Harriman, told Arab News.
“Externally, investors fled riskier assets like emerging markets during the height of the coronavirus pandemic. Some of those flows are returning, but investors are being much more discerning and Turkey does not seem so attractive.”
In terms of internal factors, Thin said that Turkish policymakers had made it hard for foreign investors to transact in Turkey. “This includes real money clients, not just speculative.
“By implementing ad hoc measures to try and limit speculative activity, Turkey has made it hard for real money as well. Besides these problems, Turkey’s fundamentals remain poor compared to much of the emerging markets.”
Erdogan allies claim international players are manipulating the Istanbul stock exchange through automated trading, and have demanded action to make it difficult for them to trade in Turkish assets.
Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan, Merrill Lynch, Barclays and Credit Suisse were banned this month from short-selling stocks for up to three months, and this year local lenders were briefly banned by the banking regulator from trading in Turkish lira with Citigroup, BNP Paribas and UBS
JPMorgan was investigated by Turkish authorities last year after the bank published a report that advised its clients to short sell the Turkish lira.
MSCI, the provider of research-based indexes and analytics, warned last month that it may relegate Turkey from emerging market status to frontier-market status because of bans on short selling and stock lending.
With the market becoming less transparent, overseas fund managers, especially with short-term portfolios, are unenthusiastic about the Turkish market and are becoming more concerned about any forthcoming introduction of other liquidity restrictions.
The exodus of foreign capital is likely to undermine Turkey’s drive for economic growth, especially during the coronavirus pandemic when employment and investment levels have gone down, with the Turkish lira facing serious volatility.