Oil recovers some losses after 6% plunge but markets remain wary

The International Energy Agency warned of unprecedented uncertainty in oil markets due to a difficult economic environment and political risk. (Reuters)
Updated 21 November 2018

Oil recovers some losses after 6% plunge but markets remain wary

  • Investors remained on edge, with the International Energy Agency warning of unprecedented uncertainty in oil markets
  • ‘The global economy is still going through a very difficult time and is very fragile’

SINGAPORE: Oil prices on Wednesday clawed back some of the previous day’s more than 6 percent plunge, lifted by a report of an unexpected decline in US commercial crude inventories as well as record Indian crude imports.
But investors remained on edge, with the International Energy Agency (IEA) warning of unprecedented uncertainty in oil markets due to a difficult economic environment and political risk.
International Brent crude oil futures were at $63.19 per barrel at 0239 GMT, up 66 cents, or 1.1 percent from their last close.
US West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures, were up 66 cents, or 1.2 percent, at $54.09 a barrel.
Wednesday’s gains came after a report by the American Petroleum Institute late on Tuesday that US commercial crude inventories last week fell unexpectedly by 1.5 million barrels, to 439.2 million, in the week to Nov. 16.
Record crude imports by India of almost 5 million barrels per day (bpd) also supported prices, traders said.
Yet Wednesday’s bounce was small in the context of the general market weakness, which saw crude tumble by more than 6 percent the previous session amid a selloff in global stock markets.
“The global economy is still going through a very difficult time and is very fragile,” IEA chief Fatih Birol said on Tuesday.
“Rising global growth fears smashed oil markets and saw European and US shares slide,” futures brokerage CMC Markets said in a daily note.
With output surging and the demand outlook deteriorating, the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) is pushing for a supply cut of between 1 million and 1.4 million bpd to prevent a repeat of the 2014 glut.
“We would anticipate further weakness until the reaction from OPEC+ (Dec. 6) and the G20 summit is clearer (Nov. 30/Dec. 1),” said Ashley Kelty, oil analyst at investment bank Cantor Fitzgerald Europe.
Despite an expectation of OPEC-led cuts, Brent and WTI prices have slumped by 28 and 30 percent respectively since early October, and the entire structure of the forward price curve has changed.
The Brent forward curve was in steep backwardation in October, implying a tight market with prices for spot delivery higher than those for later dispatch. This makes it unattractive to store oil.
Since then, however, the curve has moved into contango for most of 2019, implying oversupply as higher prices further out make it attractive to store oil for later sale.
“Investors are becoming increasingly concerned that any potential production cuts by OPEC will be insufficient to cover the surplus in the market,” ANZ bank said on Wednesday.
“The list of reasons for the decline are pretty specific ... too much supply and a risk of slowing demand growth,” said James Mick, Energy Portfolio Manager with US investment firm Tortoise.
“Part of the supply issue has been surging US production,” he added.
US crude oil production has jumped by almost a quarter this year, to a record 11.7 million bpd largely because of a surge in shale output.


IMF experts visit Lebanon amid worsening economic crisis

Updated 20 February 2020

IMF experts visit Lebanon amid worsening economic crisis

  • IMF team will provide broad technical advice
  • Lebanon has not requested IMF financial assistance

BEIRUT: A team of IMF experts met Prime Minister Hassan Diab on Thursday at the start of a visit to provide Lebanon with advice on tackling a deepening financial and economic crisis, an official Lebanese source said.

The IMF has said the team will visit until Feb. 23 and provide broad technical advice. Lebanon has not requested financial assistance from the Fund.

The long-brewing economic crisis spiraled last year as capital flows into the country slowed and protests erupted against the ruling elite over decades of corruption and bad governance.

Diab’s government, which took office last month, must decide what to do about upcoming debt payments, notably a $1.2 billion dollar-denominated sovereign bond due on March 9.

Lebanese President Michel Aoun meanwhile said on Thursday measures would be taken to hold to account all those who contributed to Lebanon’s financial crisis through illegal actions be they transfers abroad, manipulation of Eurobonds or other acts.

“There is information that we are still in need of with regards to the banking situation. There are measures that we will take to hold to account all who participated in bringing the crisis to where it is,” Aoun said, according to his Twitter account.

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One of Lebanon’s most influential politicians, Parliament Speaker Nabih Berri, said on Wednesday that debt restructuring was the best solution for looming maturities.

Lebanon will on Friday review proposals from firms bidding to give it financial and legal advice on its options, a source familiar with the matter said on Thursday. The government aims to take a quick decision on who to appoint, the source said.

So far, firms bidding to be Lebanon’s legal adviser are Dechert, Cleary Gottlieb, and White and Case, the source said.

Lebanon has issued requests for proposals to seven firms to provide it with financial advice.

The government on Wednesday formed a committee tasked with preparing an economic recovery plan that includes ministers, government officials, a central bank representative and economists, according to a copy of a decree seen by Reuters.