Egypt unveils previously unopened ancient female sarcophagus in Luxor

1 / 10
Egyptian workers and archaeologists standing next to an opened intact sarcophagus containing a well-preserved mummy of a woman named “Thuya” wrapped in linen, discovered by a French mission at the site of Tomb TT33 which dates to the 18th dynasty (16th-13th century BC) at Al-Assasif necropolis on the west bank of the Nile north of the southern Egyptian city of Luxor. (AFP)
2 / 10
A view of an opened intact Egyptian sarcophagus containing a well-preserved mummy of a woman named “Thuya” wrapped in linen, discovered by a French mission at the site of Tomb TT33 which dates to the 18th dynasty (16th-13th century BC) at Al-Assasif necropolis on the west bank of the Nile north of the southern Egyptian city of Luxor. (AFP)
3 / 10
A group of mummies stacked together at the site of Tomb TT28, which was discovered by an Egyptian archaelogical mission at Al-Assasif necropolis on the west bank of the Nile north of the southern Egyptian city of Luxor. (AFP)
4 / 10
Statuettes are arranged outside a newly discovered tomb at Al-Assasif Necropolis in Luxor, Egypt November 24, 2018. (Reuters)
5 / 10
An Egyptian archaeologist brushes the painted walls of Tomb TT28, which originally dated to the Middle Kingdom (21st-18th century BC) but was reused the Late period (7th-4th century BC), which was discovered by an Egyptian archaelogical mission at Al-Assasif necropolis on the west bank of the Nile north of the southern Egyptian city of Luxor. (AFP)
6 / 10
Carved wooden statues and funerary figurines called “Ushabtis” made of wood, faience and clay laid out on a table, discovered by an Egyptian archaelogical mission at tomb TT28 at Al-Assasif necropolis on the west bank of the Nile north of the southern Egyptian city of Luxor. (AFP)
7 / 10
A group of mummies stacked together at the site of Tomb TT28, which was discovered by an Egyptian archaelogical mission at Al-Assasif necropolis on the west bank of the Nile north of the southern Egyptian city of Luxor. (AFP)
8 / 10
Egyptian workers and archaeologists standing next to an intact sarcophagus containing a well-preserved mummy of a woman named “Thuya” wrapped in linen, discovered by a French mission at the site of Tomb TT33 which dates to the 18th dynasty (16th-13th century BC) at Al-Assasif necropolis on the west bank of the Nile north of the southern Egyptian city of Luxor. (AFP)
9 / 10
Egypt’s Antiquities Minister Khaled El-Enany (3d L), French Professor Frederic Colin (L) head of the French mission, and Mostafa Waziri, Secretary General of the Supreme Council of Antiquities (2nd L), attend the unveiling of an intact sarcophagus inside the tomb TT33 in Luxor, Egypt November 24, 2018. (Reuters)
10 / 10
An Egyptian worker standing next to an opened intact sarcophagus containing a well-preserved mummy of a woman named “Thuya” wrapped in linen, discovered by a French mission at the site of Tomb TT33 which dates to the 18th dynasty (16th-13th century BC) at the site of Tomb TT33 at Al-Assasif necropolis on the west bank of the Nile north of the southern Egyptian city of Luxor. (AFP)
Updated 24 November 2018

Egypt unveils previously unopened ancient female sarcophagus in Luxor

LUXOR, Egypt: Egyptian authorities on Saturday unveiled a well-preserved mummy of a woman inside a previously unopened coffin in Luxor in southern Egypt dating back to more than 3,000 years.
The sarcophagus, an ancient coffin, was one of two found earlier this month by a French-led mission in the northern area of El-Asasef, a necropolis on the western bank of the Nile. The first one had been opened earlier and examined by Egyptian antiquities officials.
“One sarcophagus was rishi-style, which dates back to the 17th dynasty, while the other sarcophagus was from the 18th dynasty,” Minister of Antiquities Khaled Al Anani said. “The two tombs were present with their mummies inside.”




Egypt's Antiquities Minister Khaled El-Enany (L), French Professor Frederic Colin (2nd L) head of the French mission, and Mostafa Waziri, Secretary General of the Supreme Council of Antiquities (C), attend the unveiling of an intact sarcophagus inside the tomb TT33 in Luxor. (Reuters)

The Eighteenth Dynasty dates back to the 13th century BC, a period noted for some of the most well known Pharaohs, including Tutankhamen and Ramses II.
It was the first known time that authorities had opened a previously unopened sarcophagus before international media.
Earlier in the day, authorities also revealed in the same area the tomb of the overseer of the mummification shrine identified as Thaw-Irkhet-if.




Artefacts laid out on a table, discovered by an Egyptian archaelogical mission at tomb TT28 at Al-Assasif necropolis on the west bank of the Nile north of the southern Egyptian city of Luxor. Located between the royal tombs at the Valley of the Queens and the Valley of the Kings, the Al-Assasif necropolis is the burial site of nobles and senior officials close to the pharaohs. (AFP)

The tomb contained five colored masks and some 1,000 Ushabti statutes — the miniature figurine of servants to serve the dead in the afterlife.
Three-hundred meters of rubble were removed over five months to uncover the tomb, which contained colored ceiling paintings depicting the owner and his family.
The tomb, which also contains mummies, skeletons and skulls, dates back to the middle-kingdom almost 4,000 years ago, but was reused during the late period.




An archaeologist works on a sarcophagus inside a tomb at Al-Assasif Necropolis in Luxor, Egypt. (Reuters)

Ancient Egyptians mummified humans to preserve their bodies for the afterlife, while animal mummies were used as religious offerings.
Egypt has revealed over a dozen ancient discoveries since the beginning of this year.
The country hopes these discoveries will brighten its image abroad and revive interest among travelers who once flocked to its iconic pharaonic temples and pyramids but who have shunned the country since its 2011 political uprising.


Marie Fredriksson of Swedish pop duo Roxette dies at 61

Updated 10 December 2019

Marie Fredriksson of Swedish pop duo Roxette dies at 61

  • Per Gessle: You were an outstanding musician, a master of the voice, an amazing performer
  • Fredriksson formed Roxette with Per Gessle in 1986, and in 1989, the pair had their international breakthrough with The Look

STOCKHOLM: Marie Fredriksson, the female half of the Swedish pop duo Roxette, has died at age 61, her management agency said Tuesday.
Fredriksson formed Roxette with Per Gessle in 1986. The two released their first album the same year and went on to achieve international success in the late 1980s and 1990s with hits including “The Look” and “It Must Have Been Love.”
The Dimberg Jernberg agency said Fredriksson died Monday “of the consequences of a long illness.”
It “is with great sorrow that we must inform you that one of greatest and most-loved artists is gone,” the firm said.
On his Facebook profile, Gessle wrote: “You were an outstanding musician, a master of the voice, an amazing performer.”
“I’m proud, honored and happy to have been able to share so much of your time, talent, warmth, generosity and your sense of humor,” he wrote in English, adding “Things will never be the same.”
Fredriksson was diagnosed with a brain tumor in 2002. She underwent aggressive treatment that took its toll but ultimately was successful, her management agency said. However, she was left blind in one eye, with limited hearing and mobility, and was unable to read or write. She was also unable to speak for a considerable period of time after her treatment. Over the years she was able to make a gradual return to the world stage
Fredriksson was born in southern Sweden on May 30, 1958, and had her artistic breakthrough in 1984 in Sweden. Two years later, she formed the duo Roxette with Gessle, and in 1989, the pair had their international breakthrough with “The Look.”
They achieved international success with their albums “Look Sharp!” in 1988 and “Joyride” in 1991, and had six top two hits on the Billboard Hot 100. The pair sold 80 million records worldwide and embarked on world tours.
They were Sweden’s best-known band since ABBA in the 1970s and 1980s, and in 2003, Sweden’s Carl Gustaf XVI awarded the duo a royal award. Fredriksson made her first public appearance after her brain tumor operation to receive the honor with Gessle.
Fredriksson is survived by her husband, Mikael Bolyos, and their two children, Josefin and Oscar.