Storm strands US holiday travelers, more than 1,240 flights canceled

Travelers wait for taxi at O'Hare International Airport in Chicago on Nov. 25, 2018. More than 350 flights already canceled ahead of blizzard-like storm taking aim at Chicago. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
Updated 26 November 2018

Storm strands US holiday travelers, more than 1,240 flights canceled

  • The storm was bringing winds from 30 to 35 miles per hour, say meteorologists
  • Most of the cancelations were of flights departing or arriving at Chicago's airports

WASHINGTON: Many holiday travelers in the United States were stuck at airports on the final day of Thanksgiving weekend after more than 1,240 flights were canceled because of a blizzard that swept across the Midwest, according to weather officials.
Blizzard warnings were issued in areas stretching across northeast Kansas to Chicago, with snow already falling in some regions including Kansas, central Missouri, southeast Nebraska and southern Iowa, said Bob Oravec, meteorologist for the National Weather Service.
The storm was bringing winds from 30 to 35 miles per hour (48-56 kph), with gusts of up to 45 to 50 miles mph (72-80 kph). Snowfall totals were expected to be 6 to 12 inches (15-30 cm) across those areas.
Oravec said Kansas and Chicago were likely to see “high impact” blizzard conditions later on Sunday.
More than 1,240 fights headed to or from the United States were canceled by Sunday evening, according to FlightAware.com.
Most of the cancelations were of flights departing or arriving at Chicago O’Hare International Airport and Chicago Midway Airport, which combined saw a total of about 900 flights canceled. At Kansas City International Airport, nearly 200 flights were canceled.


600,000 Rohingya still in Myanmar at ‘serious risk of genocide’: UN

Updated 30 sec ago

600,000 Rohingya still in Myanmar at ‘serious risk of genocide’: UN

  • Some 740,000 Rohingya fled burning villages, bringing accounts of murder, rape and torture from Myanmar
  • UN team says the 600,000 Rohingya still inside Myanmar’s Rakhine state

YANGON: Rohingya Muslims remaining in Myanmar still face a “serious risk of genocide,” UN investigators said Monday, warning the repatriation of a million already driven from the country by the army remains “impossible.”
The fact-finding mission to Myanmar, set up by the Human Rights Council, last year branded the army operations in 2017 as “genocide” and called for the prosecution of top generals, including army chief Min Aung Hlaing.
Some 740,000 Rohingya fled burning villages, bringing accounts of murder, rape and torture over the border to sprawling refugee camps in Bangladesh, where survivors of previous waves of persecution already languish.
But in a damning report, the UN team said the 600,000 Rohingya still inside Myanmar’s Rakhine state remain in deteriorating and “deplorable” conditions.
“Myanmar continues to harbor genocidal intent and the Rohingya remain under serious risk of genocide,” the investigators said in their final report on Myanmar, due to be presented Tuesday in Geneva.
The country is “denying wrongdoing, destroying evidence, refusing to conduct effective investigations and clearing, razing, confiscating and building on land from which it displaced Rohingya,” it said.
Myanmar military spokesman Zaw Min Tun rejected the team’s findings, calling them “one-sided.”
“Instead of making biased accusations, they should go onto the ground to see the reality,” Zaw Min Tun said.