Storm strands US holiday travelers, more than 1,240 flights canceled

Travelers wait for taxi at O'Hare International Airport in Chicago on Nov. 25, 2018. More than 350 flights already canceled ahead of blizzard-like storm taking aim at Chicago. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
Updated 26 November 2018

Storm strands US holiday travelers, more than 1,240 flights canceled

  • The storm was bringing winds from 30 to 35 miles per hour, say meteorologists
  • Most of the cancelations were of flights departing or arriving at Chicago's airports

WASHINGTON: Many holiday travelers in the United States were stuck at airports on the final day of Thanksgiving weekend after more than 1,240 flights were canceled because of a blizzard that swept across the Midwest, according to weather officials.
Blizzard warnings were issued in areas stretching across northeast Kansas to Chicago, with snow already falling in some regions including Kansas, central Missouri, southeast Nebraska and southern Iowa, said Bob Oravec, meteorologist for the National Weather Service.
The storm was bringing winds from 30 to 35 miles per hour (48-56 kph), with gusts of up to 45 to 50 miles mph (72-80 kph). Snowfall totals were expected to be 6 to 12 inches (15-30 cm) across those areas.
Oravec said Kansas and Chicago were likely to see “high impact” blizzard conditions later on Sunday.
More than 1,240 fights headed to or from the United States were canceled by Sunday evening, according to FlightAware.com.
Most of the cancelations were of flights departing or arriving at Chicago O’Hare International Airport and Chicago Midway Airport, which combined saw a total of about 900 flights canceled. At Kansas City International Airport, nearly 200 flights were canceled.


Pompeo: Anti-Daesh coalition should shift focus to Africa

Updated 32 min 55 sec ago

Pompeo: Anti-Daesh coalition should shift focus to Africa

  • Saudi Arabia’s FM and Pompeo discussed joint efforts in confronting terrorism
  • Pompeo urged members of the coalition fighting against Daesh to take extremist detainees back to their countries

LONDON: There is growing concern about the Daesh threat outside of Iraq and Syria, and the coalition fighting the terrorist organization should focus on west Africa and the Sahel region, US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said on Thursday.

Pompeo also urged members of the coalition fighting against Daesh to take extremist detainees back to their countries and step up their funding to help restore infrastructure in Iraq and Syria, parts of which have been severely damaged by conflict.

"Coalition members must take back the thousands of foreign terrorist fighters in custody, and impose accountability for the atrocities they have perpetrated," Pompeo said at the opening of a meeting of foreign ministers from the global coalition to defeat Daesh.
Pompeo vowed that the United States will keep fighting the extremist group, and reassured worried allies convened in Washington.
"The United States will continue to lead the coalition and the world on this essential security effort," Pompeo said as he opened a day of talks in Washington.

Saudi Arabia’s Minister of Foreign Affairs Prince Faisal bin Farhan headed the Kingdom’s delegation at the meeting on Thursday and met with Pompeo.

The foreign minister said that two officials discussed “the strong ties” between their countries and “the joint efforts in confronting terrorism in the region and the world.”

Daesh has lost almost all of its territory in Iraq and Syria. Former leader Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi was killed in a US raid last month, but the militant group remains a security threat in Syria and beyond.
Some 10,000 Daesh detainees and tens of thousands of family members remain in camps and prisons in northeastern Syria guarded by the Syrian Kurdish allies of the United States. Washington is pushing European countries to take their citizens back, but so far they have been reluctant to do so.
(With Reuters)