Regional pop art prints to go on sale at Sole DXB

The Library. (Courtesy of The Third Line Gallery)
Updated 11 December 2018

Regional pop art prints to go on sale at Sole DXB

DUBAI: Dubai-based urban festival Sole DXB is set to return on Dec. 6 with an exciting line-up of musicians set to perform at the celebration of all things hip-hop, fashion, art and basketball.

This year, Dubai-based The Third Line art gallery will set up a shop at the event, selling limited-edition prints by regional artists Amir H. Fallah, Farah Al-Qasimi, Hassan Hajjaj, Lamya Gargash, Nima Nabavi and Sara Naim.




Hassan Hajjaj "The Narcicyst" 2013. (Supplied)

Dubbed The Library, the shop will also offer up exclusive collaborations with three regional designers, including furniture pieces by Local Industries, which was founded in 2011 by Palestinian architects Elias and Yousef Anastas, jewelry inspired by Bedouin culture by HOOKED|HKD and glass vessels by Dima Srouji, who works with traditional glassblowers from the West Bank village of Jaba’.

Srouji’s project aims to reactivate the dying industry of Palestinian glassblowing and features glass objects that look like spiky goats, transparent cacti and giant millipedes.




Farah Al Qasimi "Falcon Hospital" 2017. (Supplied)

For art lovers who are seeking cutting-edge wall decoration, The Library’s offering of limited-edition prints is set to be quite a draw, with prints of work by the so-called “Andy Warhol of Marrakech” Hassan Hajjaj going on sale.

Hajjaj has scored more than a few celebrity fans, with US pop icon Madonna posting photos of a fun photo shoot with the artist on her Instagram account in August.

The Third Line’s booth at Sole DXB isn’t the only reason fans of art and urban culture should check out the event — a stellar lineup of performers is also set to attract hip-hop fans from around the region.




Nima Nabavi "Pixel Print" 2018. (Supplied)

Rap legend Nas will take to the stage with his socially conscious brand of hip-hop and New York-based rap duo Lion Babe, made up of Lucas Goodman and singer Jillian Harvey, will also perform. Meanwhile, Dominican-American singer DaniLeigh and British grime artist Giggs will entertain the crowd, among a host of other performers.

Founded in 2005, The Third Line represents contemporary Middle Eastern artists locally, regionally and internationally and its shop, The Library, is just one step toward making regional art a tad more affordable.


REVIEW: Hijack movie ‘7500’ opts for low-key suspense

Updated 09 July 2020

REVIEW: Hijack movie ‘7500’ opts for low-key suspense

  • Joseph Gordon-Levitt stars in tense, claustrophobic drama

AMMAN: After a string of huge movie roles, Joseph Gordon-Levitt has taken a step back from Hollywood to focus on his family in recent years. Now, the 39-year-old is back on screen playing Tobias Ellis, the first officer on a commercial flight from Berlin to Paris. When hijackers attempt to take over the plane, Tobias winds up trapped in the cockpit while chaos unfolds just a few feet away. The film — named for the emergency code given to hijacked aircraft — is the feature debut of Patrick Vollrath, a German director with an Academy Award nomination (for the short “Everything Will Be Okay”) already to his name.

Vollrath limits the action to the cockpit of the plane, creating an almost unbearably claustrophobic atmosphere that’s only heightened by the contrasting mundanity of the opening scenes. As Tobias and his captain (played by German actor Carlo Kitzlinger) go through their checklists and procedures, the knowledge that something terrible is about to happen only ratchets up the tension, and when the situation does erupt, the brutality of the attack is shocking in the extreme.

Quite deliberately, “7500” lacks the spectacle of classic disaster movies, and though it’s fiction, the obvious similarities to events such as those aboard United Airlines Flight 93 lend the movie a sense of disconcerting resonance. Gordon-Levitt turns in a masterful performance, never once seeking to dominate the film, but capturing a sense of impotent fury and fear as his place of work — previously his comfort zone — is turned into a literal prison.

Vollrath never opts for histrionics, but lets the sparse script and his semi-improvisational style empower his lead actor to bring a raw and uncompromising edge to the performance. Vollrath sidesteps many of the usual clichés used in modern terrorist movies, making less of the reasons for the attack and instead exploring the toll exerted on both sides. There’s no music score, so the movie uses the noise of the aircraft, the attack, and the muffled sounds of the world beyond the cockpit to underline just how trapped Tobias becomes.

“7500” is not an easy film to watch, and it would be hard to describe it as ‘enjoyable,’ but it is an impressive demonstration of a director and an actor at the top of their respective games.