UNICEF warns of ‘dire’ winter risks for 1 million children in Middle East and North Africa

Syrian children stand in the snow in a refugee camp in the town of Arsal in the Lebanese Bekaa valley on December 13, 2013. (AFP)
Updated 27 November 2018

UNICEF warns of ‘dire’ winter risks for 1 million children in Middle East and North Africa

  • The UN agency said it was facing a $33-million funding gap for assistance to children across the region this winter
  • Cold and rainy weather would hit those living in extremely basic conditions, especially camps or crowded shelters with little protection

AMMAN: The UN children’s fund warned Tuesday that a funding gap and the start of winter could leave nearly one million children “out in the cold” in the Middle East and North Africa.
“Years of conflict, displacement and unemployment have reduced families’ financial resources to almost nothing. Staying warm has simply become unaffordable,” said Geert Cappelaere, UNICEF regional director for the Middle East and North Africa.
The UN agency said it was facing a $33-million funding gap –- two thirds of its total allocation — for assistance to children across the region this winter.
Cold and rainy weather would hit those living in extremely basic conditions, especially camps or crowded shelters with little protection.
“With cold and rainy weather sweeping across the Middle East and North Africa, nearly one million children affected by crises in the region risk being left out in the cold,” Cappelaere said in a statement.
“With little nutritious food and health care, children have grown weak, becoming prone to hypothermia and dangerous respiratory diseases,” he said.
UNICEF said it aims this winter to reach 1.3 million children in Syria, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Turkey and Egypt, providing them with warm clothes, thermal blankets, clean water and other hygiene support.


Algeria kicks off presidential campaign, 5 candidates to run

Updated 7 min 17 sec ago

Algeria kicks off presidential campaign, 5 candidates to run

  • In some neighborhoods of Algiers, protesters have hung black trash bags on billboards featuring the candidates’ portraits

ALGIERS: Algeria’s presidential campaign officially kicked off Sunday with five candidates vying to replace the country’s longtime leader, who was pushed out in April amid sustained protests.
Two former prime ministers, Ali Benflis and Abdelmadjid Tebboune, are among those running in the Dec. 12 election to succeed former President Abdelaziz Bouteflika.
Big crowds took to the streets Friday for a 39th consecutive week to demand an end to Algeria’s post-colonial political system. Protesters say they don’t trust those currently in power to ensure democratic elections, citing their past links to Bouteflika.
Benflis and Tebboune are considered the favorites of the vote.
The other candidates are: former tourism minister and moderate Islamist Abdelkader Bengrina; former culture minister and current interim secretary of the RND party that was in the governing coalition, Azzedine Mihoubi; and Belaid Abdelaziz, who heads the small El Moustakbel (Future) party that’s close to the FLN, both of which remain part of the ruling coalition.
In some neighborhoods of Algiers, protesters have hung black trash bags on billboards featuring the candidates’ portraits, often sprayed with the words “election of shame” and “traitors.”
Benflis said this week that “this election is not held in ideal conditions, I know that, but I consider it is the shorter and less risky path to get Algeria out of the political impasse caused by the former regime.”
Tebboune acknowledged the “special climate” of the electoral process. Speaking on television earlier this month, he justified his candidacy by saying he wanted to “put Algeria back on good tracks.”
“Some Algerians are against the election, but I know a majority are for it,” he said.
Army chief Ahmed Gaid Salah, who has emerged as the country’s authority figure, repeatedly vowed that “all security conditions will be met so that Algerians can fulfill their electoral duty in full serenity.”