Australia, facing extreme weather, gains upper hand on more than 100 bushfires

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In this Nov. 2018, photo released onNov. 28, 2018, by the Queensland Fire and Emergency Service, a firefighter works on a fire ground at Deepwater, near Bundaberg, Australia. (QLD Fire and Emergency via AP)
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In this image made from aerial video taken Nov. 27, 2018, burned out buildings are seen on a scorched landscape in the Deepwater area of Queensland, Australia. (Pool Photo via AP)
Updated 29 November 2018

Australia, facing extreme weather, gains upper hand on more than 100 bushfires

SYDNEY: The threat from more than 100 fires burning across Australia’s northeast eased over the past 24 hours, lawmakers and emergency workers said on Thursday, although unfavorable weather conditions are set to continue.
Emergency workers warned on Wednesday that a spate fires had reached emergency levels, triggering an evacuation of more than 8,000 people from the town of Gracemere, about 600 km (370 miles) north of the Queensland state capital, Brisbane.
Firefighters extinguished the biggest fires after working through the night.
More than 100 fires remained alight but none was considered to pose an imminent threat, the Queensland Rural Fire Service said.
Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said residents must continue to monitor emergency warnings.
“What we experienced yesterday was off the charts,” Palaszczuk told reporters in Brisbane. “We’re still not out of the woods. There’s still a long way to go.”
The Bureau of Meteorology said temperatures across the state would ease to 33 degrees Celsius (91.4 Fahrenheit) on Thursday, down from the highs of around 40 C recorded earlier in the week.
Rain was also expected on Friday, the bureau said, offering some respite.
The hot, dry weather on Australia’s northeast coast was in stark contrast to conditions in Sydney, Australia’s largest city, on Wednesday.
More rain fell across Sydney on Wednesday than would normally be seen throughout the whole of November, the meteorology bureau said.
The torrential rain caused flash flooding, left hundreds of people without electricity and caused widespread transportation delays.


Russia deploys S-400 missile defense systems in Arctic

Updated 8 min 57 sec ago

Russia deploys S-400 missile defense systems in Arctic

  • The S-400 is one of the most advanced missile defense systems in the world and can hit enemy targets at up to 400 kilometers
  • Over the past few years Russia has significantly upgraded its military infrastructure in the Arctic

MOSCOW: Russia has placed S-400 missile defense systems at the Novaya Zemlya archipelago as Moscow seeks to increase its military presence in the Arctic, the defense ministry said on Monday.
The surface to air-missile regiment of the Northern Fleet’s air defense forces based on the archipelago’s southern Yuzhny Island has been fully equipped with new S-400 systems, the fleet said.
The regiment was earlier equipped with S-300 systems, a previous version of the missile.
The S-400 is one of the most advanced missile defense systems in the world and can hit enemy targets at up to 400 kilometers.
Over the past few years Russia has significantly upgraded its military infrastructure in the Arctic.
In addition to the Novaya Zemlya forces, the country has stationed troops in the Franz Josef Land, the New Siberian Islands and several other places.
Russia has increasingly asserted itself as an Arctic nation, proclaiming the region as a top priority due to its mineral riches and strategic importance.