Egypt, UAE and Tunisia among best countries worldwide in developing renewable energy

A wind farm, part of the Tehachapi Pass Wind Farm, is pictured in Tehachapi, California June 19, 2013. (Reuters)
Updated 25 December 2018

Egypt, UAE and Tunisia among best countries worldwide in developing renewable energy

  • Incentives provided to the private sector in those countries have encouraged it to invest in renewable energy

CAIRO: Egypt, Tunisia, and the UAE have been listed among the World Bank’s list of the best countries developing renewable energy in 2018.
A World Bank report cited by CNN Arabic listed the three Arab states, saying they have made remarkable progress in the development of renewable energy over the past seven years.
It said that incentives provided to the private sector in those countries have encouraged it to invest in renewable energy. They helped by developing the legal framework that will facilitate the private sector’s projects in this field.
The report stated that the UAE has become one of the best countries in developing energy efficiency.
It also said Egypt rose from 10 points to 68 points by 2018 on the World Bank’s Regulatory Indicators for Sustainable Energy (RISE). This has made it among the top 36 countries around the world.
The report also praised Jordan’s “notable” progress in developing renewable energy from 2010 to 2017, recording 63 points.
Renewable energy is used in the fields of heating, cooling and transport sectors.


Kuwait MPs launch probe into Airbus deal

Updated 19 February 2020

Kuwait MPs launch probe into Airbus deal

  • The decision came after a debate on allegations that Airbus paid kickbacks to secure a deal 6 years ago
  • The parliament also asked the finance ministry to review recent aircraft deals involving state-owned Kuwait Airways

KUWAIT CITY: Kuwait's parliament on Wednesday formed a fact-finding panel to probe alleged kickbacks in a deal between the national carrier and Airbus, which last month paid massive fines to settle bribery scandals.
The parliament's decision came after a special debate on allegations that Airbus paid kickbacks to secure a 25-aircraft deal six years ago.
It also asked the Audit Bureau, the state accounting watchdog, to investigate the deal, which was reportedly worth billions of dollars, although exact figures were never released.
Kuwait Airway Co. in 2014 ordered 15 Airbus 320neo and 10 Airbus 350, with delivery beginning last year and continuing until 2021.
Opposition lawmaker Riyadh al-Adasani told the session that Kuwait was mentioned in a settlement struck by Airbus in a British court on January 31, along with the names of some Kuwaiti officials and citizens.
Under the settlement, Airbus agreed to pay 3.6 billion euros ($3.9 billion) in fines to Britain, France and the United States to settle corruption probes into some of its aircraft sales.
Days after the settlement, Sri Lanka ordered an investigation into a multi-billion dollar aircraft purchase from Airbus after the deal was named in the settlement.
The former chief of Sri Lankan Airlines, Kapila Chandrasena, was arrested on February 6 for allegedly receiving bribes relating to the deal.
Earlier this month, two senior officials of the Malaysia-based AirAsia stepped aside while authorities probe unusual payments at the carrier, as the fallout from the Airbus scandal reverberated across the industry.
Kuwait in recent years also initiated criminal investigations into two large military aircraft deals involving Airbus -- a $9 billion Eurofighter Typhoon warplanes deal and a contract for 30 Caracal military helicopters costing $1.2 billion.