Saudi Arabia’s Al-Ula will be unveiled to the world ‘once work is complete’

Al-Ula Province is a key site for culture and heritage in Saudi Arabia.( Photo/Supplied)
Updated 31 December 2018

Saudi Arabia’s Al-Ula will be unveiled to the world ‘once work is complete’

  • The Tantoura winter festival has helped create ample temporary employment opportunities and taught youth how to organize events, manage crowds and improve customer service to guests

TANTORA, AL-ULA: Al-Ula, home to UNESCO World Heritage Site Madain Saleh, will be revealed to the world once tourism-related projects in the region are complete.
The announcement was made by Amr Madani, CEO of the Royal Commission for Al-Ula (RCU), during the launch of a community advocacy program aimed at promoting awareness around heritage and environmental preservation. The “Hammayah” program (Arabic for protection) was launched on Thursday at the Tantora Cultural Festival.
The program is slated to create 2,500 employment opportunities in the region, all of whom will be groomed into gatekeepers to their city’s natural wonders.
The RCU was established last year by royal decree. Hammayah will hold workshops to teach locals how to help promote and protect the region’s archaeological sites.
“We are delighted to be launching one of the most significant community initiatives in Al-Ula,” said Abdul Aziz Al-Aqeel, RCU operations officer.
“We are encouraging our people to be custodians of their homelands. Al-Ula is a place of extraordinary history and heritage.”
Intra-Kingdom travelers have engraved many messages on the rocks and mountains of Al-Ula over hundreds of years, according to Madani.
“We are now hoping tourists will come in from abroad,” he said.
“We want to ensure a strategic plan is in place before investors begin launching their businesses in the region. There has been human activity in the area for thousands of years and every generation has left behind traces of their existence. In fact, the vast landscape is dotted with some of the most fascinating and significant archaeological remains in the Middle East and North Africa.”

Attractive destination
Tourism will account for 70 percent of Al-Ula’s economy. “The region will have a tourism college by 2019,” added Madani. In addition, organizers hope the mountainous region will make for an attractive destination for filmmakers. Spanning a five-year period, the RCU-sponsored scholarship program gives youth a chance to liaise with world-class institutions in the US, UK and France, among other top-notch destinations.
Students can acquire diplomas, BAs or MAs in tourism and hospitality, agriculture, archaeology, history and any other discipline that is relevant to sustainable development.
The RCU has launched a regional online competition aimed at making Al-Ula a more obvious tourist destination. Contestants are encouraged to describe how they view the rock formations by giving them creative names. Three winners were recently chosen in the first round of the competition.
The RCU has launched a photography program aimed at encouraging the sale of the region’s most captivating images. Officials recently purchased portraits taken by talented youth in support of the local economy.
Mobile phone coverage is said to be improving in the area pending the construction of permanent telecommunications infrastructure.
The RCU recently established a council for the region’s tribal leaders, which was announced by RCU Governor Badr Al-Saud.
The commission also plans on launching an initiative to support rock-climbing and other forms of adventure-related tourism in conjunction with the Saudi Climbing Federation (SCF).
Both the RCU and the SCF have begun building infrastructure for rock-climbing routes and two tracks were recently opened to the public. The region recently held its first ever dates festival. Tantora, a mud-and-brick structure in the area’s old city, has become the region’s landmark.
The Tantora winter festival has helped create ample temporary employment opportunities and taught youth how to organize events, manage crowds and improve customer service to guests. The RCU also aims to make the region disabled-friendly and establish a rehabilitation center of its own.


Experimental cocoa bean harvest: A sweet opportunity for Saudi Arabia

Gebran Al-Maliki, owner of a cocoa plantation, says introducing cocoa will help reshape the agriculture sector. (Photos/Supplied)
Updated 01 December 2020

Experimental cocoa bean harvest: A sweet opportunity for Saudi Arabia

  • Saudi Arabia provides an environment conducive to the shrub’s growth, says expert

MAKKAH: In an unprecedented experience for the Kingdom, a harvest season of more than 200 cocoa shrubs began this year in Jazan following several years of planting the Filipino seedlings.

The foreign plant is a new experiment for the Kingdom as it plans on testing out the long-term success of planting the favored sweet treat.

Specialists in the region pointed out that the cocoa shrub resembles the famous coffee shrub found in the south region of the Kingdom, where a number of farmers have already begun to evaluate the experience and continue cultivating land to make room for more, while others were not so successful.

The supervisor of the Mountain Areas Development and Reconstruction Authority in Jazan, Eng. Bandar Al-Fifi, said: “The cocoa shrub is a tropical or subtropical shrub and is native to South America and East Asia. It was presented to the Mountain Regions Development and Reconstruction Authority a few years back, specifically to the agricultural research station.”

FASTFACTS

• The Jazan region is known for its lush, green lands and fertile soil that possesses the necessary ingredients to ensure the development of other crops.

• Rainfall is abundant, seasonal fluctuations in rainfall are scarce and humidity is high, ensuring that soil continues to retain the moisture it requires for harvests.

He added: “The cultivation process was carried out six years ago by bringing seeds and seedlings from the Philippines. The seeds were cultivated and seedlings were distributed to some interested farmers in the region.

“We in the station’s field have cocoa, banana, mango and guava trees, as well as many tropical and subtropical trees. The field is being used as a guarantor of seeds, in addition to conducting tests and real experiments in an area of 200 meters, in particular on 15 cocoa plants and the first cocoa shrub in Saudi Arabia.”

He told Arab News that it was difficult at first to encourage farmers to invest in the plant, as many were hesitant to introduce a plant not indigenous to the region in order to facilitate the establishment of manufacturing factories and grow a local market.

Al-Fifi said that in Ethiopia, companies buy crops from farmers and then start an integrated industrial process of sorting, cleaning, drying and roasting, because to complete the whole process is not economically viable for farmers alone.

“If every farmer owns 30 cocoa shrubs, this will be an additional source of income for their future,” he added.

The Jazan region is known for its lush, green lands and fertile soil that possesses the necessary ingredients to ensure the development of other crops that guarantee continuity and different harvest times for each type of plant harvested in the area. Rainfall is abundant, seasonal fluctuations in rainfall are scarce and humidity is high, ensuring that soil continues to retain the moisture it requires for harvests.

“In addition to the fact that the temperature gap between small and mature shrubs is not big, due to our proximity to the equator, Saudi Arabia is located below the tropical line, which creates environmental conditions that help the shrub grow,” said Al-Fifi.

Gebran Al-Maliki, one of the owners of a cocoa plantation in Jazan, told Arab News: “Adding cocoa to the Kingdom’s agricultural field is one of the innovative things in Saudi Arabia and it began to give good results that would broadly stimulate the development process, provide an agricultural model that can be trusted and improve experience in a country that supports its farmers and provides them with all the required capabilities.”

He received seeds and seedlings by the end of 2016 as an experiment in which everyone was granted support. “Some wanted to give this new experience a try, because it is similar to the coffee plant. It is an ordinary shrub, just like fruit and citrus trees, but it is a drought-tolerant shrub that is watered once a week.”

To successfully cultivate the fruit, Al-Maliki said that shrubs need shade when first planted in the ground as they are “quite finicky,” but that with the proper care and attention, a tree will flower at about three to four years of age and can grow up to two meters in height.

With up to 400 seeds, the product testing began on his farm after just four years.

“You can find 30 to 50 seeds inside a pod, which are later dried under the sun and ground to become a ready-to-use powder. Cocoa powder can be found in chocolate, oils and cosmetics, in addition to several other uses,” Al-Maliki said.

He said that the seed is very bitter and explained that the more bitter, the better the quality. He added that he has four shrubs, and what hindered the spreading process was waiting for the product quality test results, indicating that the fruit was tried and was found very successful.

The agricultural research station for the Development and Reconstruction of Agricultural Areas aim to reach 50 shrubs in the region to provide enough fruit to produce seeds and seedlings for farmers. Al-Fifi said that they aim to reach 400 seedlings per year that will be distributed, on top of seedlings grown by the region’s farmers themselves.