What We Are Reading Today: Killers of the Flower Moon

Updated 01 January 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Killers of the Flower Moon

Author: David Grann

David Grann is the author of the best-selling 2017 book, Killers of the Flower Moon.
The book is a meticulously researched account of an appalling widespread conspiracy against the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma.
The book chronicles the shocking true story of the murders of dozens of members of the Osage Nation in the 1920s — at the time the wealthiest people per capita in the world because of the oil riches they discovered beneath their rocky Oklahoma reservation.
The author centers the story on an Osage family that died, in ones and twos, of causes ranging from the odd and ambiguous to the obviously violent. 
Time magazine listed Killers of the Flower Moon as one of its top 10 nonfiction books of 2017.
“Killers of the Flower Moon is an irresistible combination: part history, part true crime, and part journalistic memoir, it sheds a bright light on a dark corner of our nation’s history, one that has been mostly forgotten with time,” stated a recent review published in goodreads.com


What We Are Reading Today: Journalists between Hitler and Adenauer

Updated 03 August 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Journalists between Hitler and Adenauer

Author: Volker R. Berghahn

Journalists between Hitler and Adenauer takes an in-depth look at German journalism from the late Weimar period through the postwar decades. Illuminating the roles played by journalists in the media metropolis of Hamburg, Volker Berghahn focuses on the lives and work of three remarkable individuals: Marion Countess Dönhoff, distinguished editor of Die Zeit; Paul Sethe, “the grand old man of West German journalism” and Hans Zehrer, editor in chief of Die Welt.
All born before 1914, Dönhoff, Sethe, and Zehrer witnessed the Weimar Republic’s end and opposed Hitler. When the latter seized power in 1933, they were, like their fellow Germans, confronted with the difficult choice of entering exile, becoming part of the active resistance, or joining the Nazi Party.
 Instead, they followed a fourth path—“inner emigration”—psychologically distancing themselves from the regime, their writing falling into a gray zone between grudging collaboration and active resistance. During the war, Dönhoff and Sethe had links to the 1944 conspiracy to kill Hitler, while Zehrer remained out of sight on a North Sea island. In the decades after 1945, all three became major figures in the West German media. Berghahn considers how these journalists and those who chose inner emigration interpreted Germany’s horrific past and how they helped to morally and politically shape the reconstruction of the country.