What We Are Reading Today: Killers of the Flower Moon

Updated 01 January 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Killers of the Flower Moon

Author: David Grann

David Grann is the author of the best-selling 2017 book, Killers of the Flower Moon.
The book is a meticulously researched account of an appalling widespread conspiracy against the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma.
The book chronicles the shocking true story of the murders of dozens of members of the Osage Nation in the 1920s — at the time the wealthiest people per capita in the world because of the oil riches they discovered beneath their rocky Oklahoma reservation.
The author centers the story on an Osage family that died, in ones and twos, of causes ranging from the odd and ambiguous to the obviously violent. 
Time magazine listed Killers of the Flower Moon as one of its top 10 nonfiction books of 2017.
“Killers of the Flower Moon is an irresistible combination: part history, part true crime, and part journalistic memoir, it sheds a bright light on a dark corner of our nation’s history, one that has been mostly forgotten with time,” stated a recent review published in goodreads.com


What We Are Reading Today: The Rise of Coptic

Updated 25 January 2020

What We Are Reading Today: The Rise of Coptic

Author: Jean-Luc Fournet

Coptic emerged as the written form of the Egyptian language in the third century, when Greek was still the official language in Egypt.
By the time of the Arab conquest of Egypt in 641, Coptic had almost achieved official status, but only after an unusually prolonged period of stagnation. Jean-Luc Fournet traces this complex history, showing how the rise of Coptic took place amid profound cultural, religious, and political changes in late antiquity, says a review on the Princeton University Press website.
For some 300 years after its introduction into the written culture of Egypt, Coptic was limited to biblical translation and private and monastic correspondence, while Greek retained its monopoly on administrative, legal, and literary writing.  
This changed during the sixth century, when Coptic began to penetrate domains that were once closed to it, such as literature, liturgy, regulated transactions between individuals, and communications between the state and its subjects.