What We Are Reading Today: Killers of the Flower Moon

Updated 01 January 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Killers of the Flower Moon

Author: David Grann

David Grann is the author of the best-selling 2017 book, Killers of the Flower Moon.
The book is a meticulously researched account of an appalling widespread conspiracy against the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma.
The book chronicles the shocking true story of the murders of dozens of members of the Osage Nation in the 1920s — at the time the wealthiest people per capita in the world because of the oil riches they discovered beneath their rocky Oklahoma reservation.
The author centers the story on an Osage family that died, in ones and twos, of causes ranging from the odd and ambiguous to the obviously violent. 
Time magazine listed Killers of the Flower Moon as one of its top 10 nonfiction books of 2017.
“Killers of the Flower Moon is an irresistible combination: part history, part true crime, and part journalistic memoir, it sheds a bright light on a dark corner of our nation’s history, one that has been mostly forgotten with time,” stated a recent review published in goodreads.com


What We Are Reading Today: Under the Influence by Robert H. Frank

Updated 27 January 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Under the Influence by Robert H. Frank

Psychologists have long understood that social environments profoundly shape our behavior, sometimes for the better, often for the worse. 

But social influence is a two-way street— our environments are themselves products of our behavior. Under the Influence explains how to unlock the latent power of social context. 

It reveals how our environments encourage smoking, bullying, tax cheating, sexual predation, problem drinking, and wasteful energy use. We are building bigger houses, driving heavier cars, and engaging in a host of other activities that threaten the planet — mainly because that’s what friends and neighbors do.

In the wake of the hottest years on record, only robust measures to curb greenhouse gases promise relief from more frequent and intense storms, droughts, flooding, wildfires, and famines. Robert Frank describes how the strongest predictor of our willingness to support climate-friendly policies, install solar panels, or buy an electric car is the number of people we know who have already done so. In the face of stakes that could not be higher, the book explains how we could redirect trillions of dollars annually in support of carbon-free energy sources.