Study details how high fiber diets make for healthier lives

This undated photo provided by America's Test Kitchen in December 2018 shows Tabbouleh in Brookline, Mass. (AP)
Updated 11 January 2019

Study details how high fiber diets make for healthier lives

  • A good target for those wanting to reap health gains would be to eat 25g to 29g of dietary fiber a day

LONDON: People who eat lots of high-fiber and whole grain foods have lower risk of heart disease, stroke, diabetes and other chronic diseases than people whose diets are low in fiber, a study commissioned by the World Health Organization (WHO) says.
For every 8 gram increase in fiber eaten a day, total deaths and incidences of heart disease, type 2 diabetes and bowel cancer fell by 5 to 27 percent, the study said. Protection against stroke and breast cancer also rose.
A good target for those wanting to reap health gains would be to eat 25g to 29g of dietary fiber a day, the analysis found. But the data, published in a series of systematic reviews and meta-analyzes in The Lancet medical journal, also suggested higher dietary fiber intakes could give even greater protection.
“Our findings provide convincing evidence for nutrition guidelines to focus on increasing dietary fiber and on replacing refined grains with whole grains. This reduces incidence risk and mortality from a broad range of important diseases,” said Jim Mann, a professor at the University of Otago, New Zealand who co-led the research.
According to the study, most people worldwide currently consume less than 20g of dietary fiber a day. In Britain in 2015, an advisory committee on nutrition recommended an increase in dietary fiber intake to 30g a day, but only 9 percent of British adults manage to reach this target. In the United States, fiber intake among adults averages 15g a day.
Mann said the health benefits of dietary fiber — contained in foods such as whole grains, pulses, vegetables and fruit — come from its chemistry, physical properties, physiology and its effects on metabolism.
“Fibre-rich whole foods that require chewing and retain much of their structure in the gut increase satiety and help weight control, He said. “(And) the breakdown of fiber in the large bowel by the resident bacteria has additional wide-ranging effects including protection from colorectal cancer.” (Reporting by Kate Kelland)


What We Are Eating Today: Shiro

Updated 05 June 2020

What We Are Eating Today: Shiro

It is always refreshing to stumble across a new eatery and for me, this was one unexpected bonus to come out of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) quarantine period.

Gripped by a sudden lockdown craving for sushi, I took to the HungerStation app to search for a suitable Japanese restaurant and found Shiro.

Opened in Riyadh in 2017, it has yet to achieve the recognition of other sushi chains such as Sushi Yoshi, Tokyo, or Nozomi. But my first experience of Shiro certainly set my taste buds buzzing.

From the standard California roll to the more adventurous dragon-eye fry, Shiro’s menu covers a wide range of the sushi spectrum, including traditional, purist-friendly sashimi.

I would recommend the deep-fried, sauce-doused special avocado fry, as well as the rainbow roll California, and the mixed tempura futomaki. For a tamer option, go for the classic temaki.

The restaurant also offers dishes to satisfy non-sushi palates, which can help settle family debates over which outlet to order from.

One of the menu highlights was Shiro’s miso soup with its perfectly balanced flavors. My fellow diners also enjoyed the crab salad, which came with a lovely light dressing, crunchy sweetcorn, and baby corn, and the chicken noodles were another big hit.

Shiro gives customers the option to customize any of its wok entrees, and we chose chicken, udon noodles, and teriyaki sauce. The udon noodles are the real deal; thick, chewy, and utterly satisfying. Orders can be made online at https://shiro.com.sa or via HungerStation.