Indonesia’s plans to regulate ride-hailing rates threaten Grab, Go-Jek models

Indonesia’s plans to regulate ride-hailing rates threaten Grab, Go-Jek models
Motorcycle taxi drivers working for Grab and Go-Jek in Jakarta have held protest rallies since 2018 calling for higher fares and better conditions. (Reuters)
Updated 11 January 2019

Indonesia’s plans to regulate ride-hailing rates threaten Grab, Go-Jek models

Indonesia’s plans to regulate ride-hailing rates threaten Grab, Go-Jek models
  • Since 2018, motorcycle taxi drivers working for Grab and Go-Jek in Jakarta have held protest rallies calling for higher fares and better conditions
  • ‘Cheap fares has been the firms’ main way to attract customers’

JAKARTA: Indonesia is preparing to launch regulations fixing the rates drivers and riders for ride-hailing services such as Grab and Go-Jek receive, two government officials said this week, creating potential obstacles for the companies’ expansion.
The regulations would meet drivers’ demands for more oversight and higher rates but there are concerns that the rising costs to the companies could stifle their development as they battle to dominate the ride-hailing market in Southeast Asia’s biggest economy.
Singapore-based Grab and home grown Go-Jek have been locked in price wars in Indonesia, part of a wider fight to bring banking, e-commerce, ride-hailing, food-delivery and other services to every corner of Southeast Asia.
However, since 2018, motorcycle taxi drivers working for Grab and Go-Jek in Jakarta have held protest rallies calling for higher fares and better conditions.
Indonesia’s Ministry of Transportation plans to implement minimum and maximum tariffs for car and motor bike ride-hailing that will be “higher than Go-Jek and Grab’s current rates” and impose limits on promotional price cuts, said Budi Setyadi, director general of land transportation at the ministry.
“This is for the safety and protection of drivers,” he said.
The ministry’s Public Transportation Director Ahmad Yani said a dependency on incentive-driven payments and low fixed rates per kilometer was a safety risk as it led to drivers overworking.
Yani said Grab paid 1,200 rupiah ($0.085) per km (0.6 miles) with a focus on bonuses, while Go-Jek’s rate was 1,400 rupiah ($0.099) per km.
The officials said fixed fare ranges for motor bikes were still being finalized, but would be implemented from March.
Fixed rates for ride-hailing cars will start in June and be set at 3,500 to 6,000 rupiah ($0.43) per km in the islands of Java, Sumatra, and Bali.
The drivers were pushing for increases to a standard fare of 3,000 to 4,000 rupiah per km.
The firms said they welcomed the new rules, though they had not seen details of the motor bike regulations.
“Grab believes the government will develop the best regulatory framework and hopes that all stakeholders will be included in the process,” said the company’s Head of Public Affairs Tri Sukma Anreianno.
A Go-Jek spokesman said: “We support the government’s spirit to encourage our driver partners ... and hope the regulation will have a positive impact on the sustainability of drivers’ income ... and fair business competition.”
However, both transport officials said the companies are worried about the pending regulation since they have spent heavily on driver subsidies to slash their customer rates and build their businesses.
“Grab and Go-Jek have told me they would prefer there was no regulation,” said Yani. “Due to the competition between them ... they are scared what could happen if they don’t keep up with each other.”
Indonesia’s Supreme Court blocked a previous transport ministry attempt to fix ride-hailing rates in 2017 after drivers sued saying the rules favored the taxi firms.
Both ministry officials said the new regulations met anti-competition standards and followed extensive discussions with driver syndicates.
Grab and Go-Jek drivers welcomed the prospect of standard fares.
“I have been working for Grab since 2015. Before, I could earn 300,000 to 400,000 rupiah per day. Now, I can only get 150,000 rupiah,” said Grab motor bike chauffeur Hermansyah.
Another driver, who had worked for both companies, said neither provided much protection, leading drivers to bear operational costs. He asked not to be identified since he had a role in organizing protests.
The fixed rates will be a challenge to a business model that has depended on cheap passenger prices for growth and could undermine innovation.
“Cheap fares has been the firms’ main way to attract customers,” said Yayat Suprityatna, Urban and Transportation Observer at Trisakti University in Jakarta.


Flagship Huawei store in Saudi Arabia will be its biggest outside China

Flagship Huawei store in Saudi Arabia will be its biggest outside China
Terry He, the CEO of Huawei Tech Investment in Saudi Arabia, said the Kingdom is a very important market for the company. (AFP)
Updated 5 min 24 sec ago

Flagship Huawei store in Saudi Arabia will be its biggest outside China

Flagship Huawei store in Saudi Arabia will be its biggest outside China

RIYADH/JEDDAH: Chinese tech firm Huawei has signed an agreement with Kaden Investment for the launch in Saudi Arabia of its largest store outside China.
During the signing ceremony, at the Ministry of Investment headquarters in Riyadh, Investment Minister Khalid Al-Falih highlighted the importance of investment in information and communications technology, along with energy and entertainment, which are important pillars of the Kingdom’s Vision 2030 development plan.
He said that the agreement with Huawei is a symbol of the prosperity that comes from long-term partnerships, in this case a 20-year relationship with the Chinese business. It is a “long-standing digital partner and ahead of the curve” in spotting the potential offered by the Kingdom, he added.
“Huawei has played an instrumental role in Saudi Arabia’s development, collaborating with government and private enterprises to enhance our nation’s technological infrastructure,” said Al-Falih. “It continues to share our commitment to talent development, innovation and ambition, the values which underpin Vision 2030.”
Terry He, the CEO of Huawei Tech Investment in Saudi Arabia, said the Kingdom is a very important market for the company.
“It gives me great pleasure to announce the next step in Huawei’s commitment to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, to open the largest Huawei flagship store in the overseas market,” he added. “This will provide customers with an unprecedented, immersive full-scenario experience.”
Fahad Alarjani, a member of the Saudi Chinese Business Council, welcomed the agreement as a “huge success” for the Ministry of Investment, in collaboration with other Saudi ministries, in attracting high-tech investments to Saudi Arabia, “especially given that Huawei is considered a technology giant in China and the world.”
Alarjani, a doctorate-level scholar in sustainable entrepreneurship, SMEs development, and marketing strategies, said it is important that agencies in the Kingdom work together to create a fertile, world-leading environment for investors so that they can attract the latest, and sustainable, technological innovations.
“This will help to open new markets and speed up entrepreneurial development,” he added. “It is important to be aware of the fact that Chinese companies are working hard on being pioneers of 5G.”

The agreement with Huawei is a symbol of the prosperity that comes from long-term partnerships, in this case a 20-year relationship with the Chinese business.

Khalid Al-Falih, Investment minister

Saleh M. Al-Saleem, a professor of computer and information sciences at King Saud University, said: “The agreement will definitely entail training programs to transfer technology, and an investment by a company of this size in the Saudi market is an acknowledgment on its part of the huge size of the technological sector in the Kingdom.”


He added that the agreement opens the door for increased competition between the biggest international companies in the sector, and will contribute to lower costs and enhanced services in the Kingdom.
Saudi consumers also expressed excitement about the news. Pharmaceutical science graduate Ruwaid Mahalawi, 29, who lives in Jeddah and describes himself as a Huawei fan, said: “It’s nice to see big names coming into Saudi Arabia and this is only the start — it will inspire more companies to invest in the Kingdom and recognize the market is extremely welcoming.”
Saudis are a very tech savvy society, he said. “Children and adults alike use electronic devices — especially now, with the pandemic — whether it’s for work or schooling. I think it’s shedding light on how big the market is here.”
Mahalawi’s wife, 26-year-old Wajd Abdullah, is also a fan of the Chinese firm and said she ditched her iPhone for a Huawei Mate. She appreciates the added level of service that is provided when a tech brand sells its products through its own stores, rather than through third-party retailers.
“It’s always best when a brand’s own store opens,” she said. “You don’t have to worry about insurance for the gadgets or quality. The store staff will be more knowledgeable and helpful, too, and that helps to ensure customers will return.”
An opening date for the new store, which will be in Riyadh, has yet to be announced.