Ivanka Trump among possible World Bank nominees

Ivanka Trump was the driving force behind a $1 billion World Bank fund to promote entrepreneurship by women. (AFP)
Updated 12 January 2019

Ivanka Trump among possible World Bank nominees

  • Nikki Haley also in the running according to Financial Times report

WASHINGTON: Donald Trump’s daughter and adviser Ivanka and the former UN Ambassador Nikki Haley are among possible US candidates to replace outgoing World Bank President Jim Yong Kim, The Financial Times reported Friday.
Kim abruptly announced Monday he was cutting short his tenure as the bank’s president more than three years before his second term was due to end.
In addition to Trump and Haley, who stepped down as US Ambassador to the United Nations last month, other names being floated include Treasury Undersecretary for International Affairs David Malpass and Mark Green, head of the US Agency for International Development, the newspaper reported.
Ivanka Trump in 2017 was the driving force behind a $1 billion, Saudi-supported World Bank fund to promote entrepreneurship by women.
The Treasury Department told AFP on Friday that it had no comment in potential candidates.
The department has received a “significant number of recommendations,” a spokesperson said.
“We are beginning the internal review process for a US nominee. We look forward to working with the governors to select a new leader.”
Under an unwritten agreement, the United States, which is the bank’s largest shareholder, has always chosen its leader since the institution was founded following World War II.
But the success of a US candidate no longer appears completely assured.
Kim was the first American nominee to face a contested election for the World Bank presidency in 2012 and the bank’s board has said its selection process will be “open, merit-based and transparent,” implying non-US candidates would not be ruled out.
The World Bank Board said Thursday it would start accepting nominations for a new leader early next month and name a replacement for Kim by mid-April.


US to extend license for its companies to continue business with Huawei

Updated 5 min 57 sec ago

US to extend license for its companies to continue business with Huawei

  • A longer extension is in the works but has not yet been finalized due to regulatory hurdles

WASHINGTON: The Trump administration is set to issue a two-week extension of a license allowing US companies to continue doing business with China’s Huawei Technologies, two sources familiar with the deliberations said.

The extension of around two weeks is far shorter than the prior 90-day extension and a longer extension is in the works but has not yet been finalized due to regulatory hurdles, said one source who was briefed on the matter.

After adding Huawei to an economic blacklist in May citing national security concerns, the US Commerce Department has allowed it to purchase some American-made goods in a move aimed at minimizing disruption for its customers, many of which operate networks in rural America.

The extension will be announced on Monday, when the earlier reprieve is set to expire, the sources said, declining to be identified as the extension has not been publicly announced.

A spokesman for Huawei, the world’s biggest maker of telecom network equipment, said the company does not comment on rumors and speculation. The Commerce Department declined to comment.

HIGHLIGHTS

  • US added Huawei to an economic blacklist in May citing national security concerns.
  • The Commerce Department is also considering whether to grant individual licenses for US firms to sell components to Huawei.

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross told Fox Business Network on Friday that some rural carriers need the temporary licenses and are dependent on Huawei for 3G and 4G networks.

“There are enough problems with telephone service in the rural communities — we don’t want to knock them out. So, one of the main purposes of the temporary general licenses is to let those rural guys continue to operate,” Ross said.

The development comes amid discussions between the US and China aimed at coming to an initial agreement to resolve a trade war that has lasted for over a year.

In blacklisting Huawei, the US government said it had a “reasonable basis to conclude that Huawei is engaged in activities that are contrary to US national security or foreign policy interests.” Huawei has repeatedly denied the accusations.

Attorney General William Barr said on Thursday Huawei and ZTE Corp. “cannot be trusted,” as he backed a proposal to bar US rural wireless carriers from tapping an $8.5 billion government fund to purchase equipment or services from them.

In May, President Donald Trump also signed an executive order declaring a national emergency and barring US companies from using telecommunications equipment made by companies posing a national security risk. The Commerce Department was due to draw up an enforcement plan by mid-October but has yet to publish one.

The Commerce Department is also considering whether to grant individual licenses for US firms to sell components to Huawei after receiving more than 200 requests.