Russia’s RDIF to boost investment deals in Saudi Arabia

Kirill Dmitriev CEO of Russian Direct Investment Fund attends the Future Investment Initiative last year. (AFP)
Updated 18 January 2019

Russia’s RDIF to boost investment deals in Saudi Arabia

  • Fund's CEO Kirill Dmitriev leads a delegation of more than 20 Russian business figures to the Kingdom
  • The delegation discussed projects in oil refining, petrochemical, gas chemical and oilfield services

RIYADH: Russian sovereign wealth fund RDIF said on Wednesday it would significantly boost its investments deals with Saudi Arabia in 2019.

The fund’s CEO Kirill Dmitriev led a delegation of more than 20 Russian business figures to the Kingdom to discuss new projects.

Saudi Energy Minister Khalid Al-Falih met Dmitriev in Riyadh and expressed his happiness on the progress they made in the talks and the cooperation between the two countries. 

“Its not only commercial cooperation, but we are also working on scientific research, and we have opened a research center in Moscow University,” Al-Falih said.

The minister said the Russian delegation will also meet officials from Saudi Basic Industries Corporation SABIC and mining company Ma’aden among other companies during their three day visit to the Kingdom.

The delegation discussed projects in oil refining, petrochemical, gas chemical and oilfield services sectors, a Russian Direct Investment Fund statement said.

Al-Falih added that the Russian side has started a rubber plant project in Al-Jubail with Total and Novomet.

RDIF already has a $10 billion investment partnership with the Saudi Public Investment Fun (PIF), with more than $2 billion already invested in projects.

“We extend our cooperation not only on oil cuts but to cooperate in oil services, technology, LG and petrochemicals,” Dmitriev said. “We believe Saudi Aramco can be one of the greatest partners of Russia.”

The CEO said they were continuing to cooperate with PIF in Saudi Arabia through a number of energy investments.

Russian companies are also keen to invest in the Kingdom’s planned $500 billion mega-city NEOM.

“We have companies that have interest to invest in NEOM, we would like to build a port in NEOM, it can be a big port,” Dmitriev said.


Investors, scientists urge IEA to take bolder climate stance

Updated 30 May 2020

Investors, scientists urge IEA to take bolder climate stance

  • The energy agency’s head is under pressure to align its policies with the 2015 Paris accord goals

LONDON: Fatih Birol, the head of the International Energy Agency (IEA), faced renewed calls to take a bolder stance on climate change on Friday from investors concerned the organization’s reports enable damaging levels of investment in fossil fuels.

In an open letter, investor groups said an IEA report on options for green economic recoveries from the coronavirus pandemic, due out in June, should be aligned with the 2015 Paris accord goal of capping the rise in global temperatures at 1.5C.

The more than 60 signatories included the Institutional Investors Group on Climate Change, whose members have €30 trillion ($33.42 trillion) of assets under management, scientists and advocacy group Oil Change International.

“Bold, not incremental, action is required,” the letter said.

The Paris-based IEA said it appreciated feedback and would bear the letter’s suggestions in mind. It also said it had been recognized for leading calls on governments to put clean energy at the heart of their economic stimulus packages.

“We have backed up that call with a wide range of analysis, policy recommendations and high-level events with government ministers, CEOs, leading investors and thought leaders,” the IEA said.

Birol has faced mounting pressure in the past year from critics who say oil, gas and coal companies use the IEA’s flagship World Energy Outlook (WEO) annual report to justify further investment — undermining the Paris goals.

Birol has dismissed the criticism, saying the WEO helps governments understand the potential climate implications of their energy policies, and downplaying its influence on investment decisions.

FASTFACT

1.5°C

The 2015 Paris accord aims to cap the rise in global temperatures at 1.5C.

But campaigners want Birol to overhaul the WEO to chart a more reliable 1.5C path. The world is on track for more than double that level of heating, which would render the planet increasingly uninhabitable, scientists say.

The joint letter followed similar demands last year, and was published by Mission 2020, an initiative backed by former UN climate chief Christiana Figueres.