EU takes aim at Turkish steel sector

Further EU caps on steel could force some Turkish mills to close. (Shutterstock)
Updated 18 January 2019

EU takes aim at Turkish steel sector

  • The Commission said it will extend and beef up its existing ‘safeguard’ steel import caps until July 2021
  • For Turkey’s vast steel sector, the fourth largest contributor to the country’s economy, the caps could prove particularly painful

LONDON: The European Commission’s move to extend its steel import restrictions threatens to force Turkish mills, already buckling under the weight of US tariffs, to cut production further or in some cases close down, sources said.
The Commission said on Wednesday it will extend and beef up its existing “safeguard” steel import caps until July 2021 to counter concerns that European Union markets are being flooded with steel no longer being exported to the US.
For Turkey’s vast steel sector, the fourth largest contributor to the country’s economy, the caps could prove particularly painful as the EU has given it additional “country-specific” quotas.
Under the safeguards, Turkey has a tariff-free quota for rebar, a construction steel that makes up most of its steel exports, of around 300,000 tons for the first nine months of the respective quota periods, down 60 percent from its 2018 exports.
Country-specific restrictions do not apply in the last three months of the quota periods and Turkey could make up some sales then, but its annual export levels will still be sharply lower.
“Our export markets have disappeared, the local market hardly exists, we’ve got lots of capacity and no market,” said a London-based Turkish steel trader.
He added that hopes the US would soon cut its 50 percent tariff on Turkish steel imports were also fading given it is demanding that in return, Ankara hold fire on Kurdish forces in Syria, something Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan cannot do ahead of local elections.

 

 Major Turkish mills such as Cebitas and Ekinciler said they had, before the EU announcement, already slashed output while Koc Metalurji said it had stopped output for about a month.
Erdemir, Turkey’s largest producer, said it was producing as normal.
Investment bank Jefferies estimates EU caps on rebar from all countries combined should reduce its total rebar imports by at least 28 percent a year, adding that producers such as ArcelorMittal and CMC should benefit most from EU caps on long products like rebar.
“(EU) quotas for (Turkish) rebar are extremely low and will be exceeded in the first one or two months. Local demand is also extremely poor,” said Turkish Steel Exporters’ Association (CIB) head Adnan Aslan.
The CIB estimated late last year, before the latest EU move, that Turkey’s steel production, consumption and exports would fall 30 percent this year.
Wednesday’s beefed-up EU safeguards come after the US placed tariffs of 25 percent on
imported steel early last year, while singling out Turkey later in the year with tariffs of 50 percent due to political tensions with
Ankara.
The US had been Turkey’s largest steel export destination in 2017, but the country’s steel flows to the EU ballooned 80 percent last year, according to Jefferies, making the EU Turkey’s the largest steel export destination.
“Traditional export destinations (for Turkish mills) are closing one after the other. Most probably, the (EU) quotas will be filled immediately, so EU producers will have a relatively good year,” the International Rebar Producers and Exports Association said in a note.

FASTFACTS

The US had been Turkey’s largest steel export destination in 2017, but the country’s steel flows to the EU ballooned 80 percent last year.


Saudi Arabia opens new logistics zone in Jeddah

Updated 13 October 2019

Saudi Arabia opens new logistics zone in Jeddah

  • The Al-Khomra zone extends over 2.3m square meters in Jeddah
  • It will support activities around shipping, freight distribution and transport of goods

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia launched on Sunday a new logistics zone open to private investors in the Red Sea port city of Jeddah, as part of a wider industrial initiative to diversify the economy away from oil and create jobs for Saudis.
The Al-Khomra zone — which will support activities around shipping, freight distribution and transport of goods — extends over 2.3 million square meters in Jeddah, home to one of the Kingdom’s largest ports.
As the biggest logistics zone in the country, it hopes to turn Saudi Arabia into a global logistics hub and create 10,000 direct jobs, said Minister of Transport Nabeel Al-Amudi.
It is part of the broader National Industrial Development and Logistics Program (NIDLP), which aims to create 1.6 million jobs and attract investments worth SR 1.6 trillion ($427 billion) over the next decade. Of that, SR 135 billion is earmarked for investment in the logistics sector.
Under its ambitious reform strategy, the Kingdom plans to have the private sector operate much of its transport infrastructure, including airports and sea ports, with the government keeping a role as regulator.
Details of what the government plans to offer investors in Al-Khomra were not disclosed, but the Saudi Ports Authority  (Mawani) said the zone would offer opportunities to investors on a lease basis.
“Investment in the logistics zone in Al-Khomra and other ports will total SR 7 billion,” said Saad Al-Khalb, president of the Saudi Ports Authority.
Al-Khomra joins other logistics zones in the `kingdom — the King Abdullah Economic City north of Jeddah has its own port and offers logistics investments and NEOM, a mega project announced in 2017, has plans for a logistics zone.
Over a decade ago, the Saudi government spent $30 billion to build six economic cities across the Kingdom to diversify the economy, create jobs for young Saudis and attract foreign investment, though many of the projects have failed to achieve expected results.
After decades of spending on development projects, the government has made attracting greater foreign investment a cornerstone of its Vision 2030 plan.