Saudi Arabia unemployment edges down

A Saudi vendor waits for customers at a mobile shop in Riyadh, pictured on March 21, 2016. (Reuters)
Updated 27 January 2019

Saudi Arabia unemployment edges down

  •  The General Authority for Statistics publishes its Labor Force Survey on a quarterly basis
  • The unemployment rate for Saudi females decreased to 30.9 percent

JEDDAH: Unemployment among Saudi Arabian citizens eased marginally to 12.8 percent in the third quarter of 2018, official figures released on Sunday showed.
The jobless rate first hit 12.9 percent, the highest level recorded by the statistics agency in data going back to 1999, in the first quarter of 2018 as private employers were hit by a new sales tax and a domestic fuel price hike.

 

 The General Authority for Statistics publishes its Labor Force Survey on a quarterly basis, based on administrative records with relevant authorities including the Ministry of Labor and Social Development, Ministry of Civil Service, General Organization for Social Insurance, Human Resources Development Fund and National Information Center.
The unemployment rate for Saudi females decreased to 30.9 percent compared with 31.1 percent in the second quarter of 2018, and for Saudi males it decreased to 7.5 percent compared to 7.6 percent in the second quarter.
The survey also showed a decrease in the number of non-Saudi male employees from the Kingdom’s administrative records, standing at 8,622,890 against 8,927,862 in the previous quarter. The number of non-Saudi female workers increased by 9,696 to reach 964,861.

FASTFACTS

12.8% — Unemployment rate in the third quarter of 2018


BT warns UK that banning Huawei too fast could cause outages

Updated 13 July 2020

BT warns UK that banning Huawei too fast could cause outages

  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson is due to decide this week whether to impose tougher restrictions on Huawei
  • British PM in January granted Huawei a limited role in the 5G network

LONDON: BT CEO Philip Jansen urged the British government on Monday not to move too fast to ban China’s Huawei from the 5G network, cautioning that there could be outages and even security issues if it did.
Prime Minister Boris Johnson is due to decide this week whether to impose tougher restrictions on Huawei, after intense pressure from the United States to ban the Chinese telecoms behemoth from Western 5G networks.
Johnson in January defied President Donald Trump and granted Huawei a limited role in the 5G network, but the perception that China did not tell the whole truth over the coronavirus crisis and a row over Hong Kong has changed the mood in London.
“If you are to try not to have Huawei at all, ideally we would want seven years and we could probably do it in five,” Jansen told BBC radio.
Asked what the risks would be if telecoms operators were told to do it in less than five years, Jansen said: “We need to make sure that any change of direction does not lead to more risk in the short term.”
“If we get to a situation where things need to go very, very fast, then you are into a situation where potentially service for 24 million BT Group mobile customers is put into question — outages,” he said.
In what some have compared to the Cold War antagonism with the Soviet Union, the United States is worried that 5G dominance is a milestone toward Chinese technological supremacy that could define the geopolitics of the 21st century.
The United States says Huawei is an agent of the Chinese Communist State and cannot be trusted.
Huawei, the world’s biggest producer of telecoms equipment, has said the United States wants to frustrate its growth because no US company could offer the same range of technology at a competitive price.