Saudi Arabia unemployment edges down

A Saudi vendor waits for customers at a mobile shop in Riyadh, pictured on March 21, 2016. (Reuters)
Updated 27 January 2019

Saudi Arabia unemployment edges down

  •  The General Authority for Statistics publishes its Labor Force Survey on a quarterly basis
  • The unemployment rate for Saudi females decreased to 30.9 percent

JEDDAH: Unemployment among Saudi Arabian citizens eased marginally to 12.8 percent in the third quarter of 2018, official figures released on Sunday showed.
The jobless rate first hit 12.9 percent, the highest level recorded by the statistics agency in data going back to 1999, in the first quarter of 2018 as private employers were hit by a new sales tax and a domestic fuel price hike.

 

 The General Authority for Statistics publishes its Labor Force Survey on a quarterly basis, based on administrative records with relevant authorities including the Ministry of Labor and Social Development, Ministry of Civil Service, General Organization for Social Insurance, Human Resources Development Fund and National Information Center.
The unemployment rate for Saudi females decreased to 30.9 percent compared with 31.1 percent in the second quarter of 2018, and for Saudi males it decreased to 7.5 percent compared to 7.6 percent in the second quarter.
The survey also showed a decrease in the number of non-Saudi male employees from the Kingdom’s administrative records, standing at 8,622,890 against 8,927,862 in the previous quarter. The number of non-Saudi female workers increased by 9,696 to reach 964,861.

FASTFACTS

12.8% — Unemployment rate in the third quarter of 2018


Turkey on brink of recession as economy collapses

Updated 13 August 2020

Turkey on brink of recession as economy collapses

  • Consumer debt has increased by 25 percent to more than $100 billion in the past three months

JEDDAH: President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s popularity is plunging in lockstep with Turkey’s collapsing economy and the country is on the verge of a potentially devastating recession, financial experts have told Arab News.
The value of the Turkish lira has fallen to 7.30 against the US dollar and the central bank has spent $65 billion to prop up the currency, according to the US investment bank Goldman Sachs.
Consumer debt has increased by 25 percent to more than $100 billion in the past three months as the government moved to help families during the coronavirus pandemic, but the result has been a surge in inflation to 12 percent.
With the falling lira and increased price of imported goods, the living standards of many Turks who earn in lira but have dollar debts have fallen sharply.
The economy is expected to shrink by about 4 percent this year. The official unemployment rate remains at 12.8 percent because layoffs are banned, although many experts say the real figures are far higher.
To complete the perfect storm, tourism revenues and exports have been decimated by the pandemic, and foreign capital has fled amid fears over economic trends and the independence of the central bank.
Wolfango Piccoli, of Teneo Intelligence in London, said logic dictated an increase in interest rates but “this is unlikely to happen.”
Piccoli said central bank officials would strive to avoid an outright rate hike at their monetary policy meeting on Aug. 20. “A mix of controlled devaluation and backdoor policies, such as limiting Turkish lira’s liquidity, remains their preferred approach,” he said.
There is speculation of snap elections, and Erdogan’s view is that higher interest rates cause inflation, despite considerable economic evidence to the contrary.