Go-getter Gigi launches a sportswear line

Go-getter Gigi launches a sportswear line
Gigi Hadid at an event late last year. (AFP)
Updated 05 February 2019

Go-getter Gigi launches a sportswear line

Go-getter Gigi launches a sportswear line

DUBAI: US-Palestinian model Gigi Hadid has unveiled her new athleisure collection with Reebok — complete with a 1980s-inspired color theme, fashionable co-ords and streetstyle sneakers.

On Instagram, Hadid gushed about the new collection, saying it is especially important to her because of her love of sports.

“Designing my first athleisure collection for (Reebok) was everything I’d hoped. Growing up, sports played such a big part in my life, and many of the lessons I learned as an athlete have been true guides for me in my personal and professional life,” she shared.



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Designing my first athleisure collection for @Reebok @ReebokClassics was everything I’d hoped. Growing up, sports played such a big part in my life, and many of the lessons I learned as an athlete have been true guides for me in my personal and professional life. Today, two of my high school volleyball coaches have come across the country to NYC to help me launch this first #REEBOKxGIGI collection with a day on the court. This amazing collision of worlds is the epitome of what this collection means to me and I really hope you love wearing it in and out of the gym. It’s made for play !!!!!!!!!!!! With love. xG (Full collection available tomorrow 2/5 online reebok.co/gigi_collection and in select stores worldwide)

A post shared by Gigi Hadid (@gigihadid) on

“Today, two of my high school volleyball coaches have come across the country to NYC to help me launch this first #REEBOKxGIGI collection with a day on the court. This amazing collision of worlds is the epitome of what this collection means to me and I really hope you love wearing it in and out of the gym.”

She shared a flurry of promotional photos on Instagram, including snaps of herself in active poses — running, jumping and posing up a storm with a lush forest in the background.

The 23-year-old model was spotted wearing her Reebok gear in New York shortly after she posted the announcement on Instagram.

She was seen wearing a pair of he chunky Aztrek Double X Gigi Hadid sneakers along with a simple black t-shirt.

It turns out the Victoria’s Secret beauty was visiting the DREAM Charter School in East Harlem, where she posed in the locker room before sitting down with several schoolchildren to sign apparel from her line.

She then showed off her volleyball skills and was snapped leaping into the air on the court as students looked on from the stands.

“Thank you to my @reebok family and my high school coaches @awexla @carlos.gray9 for a perfect day of play,” she posted on Instagram.

The collection is available online at reebk.co/gigi_collection and in select stores worldwide.


Gigi Hadid opens and closes Versace Fall 2021 show

Gigi Hadid closes the Versace Fall 2021 Ready-to-Wear show. Supplied
Gigi Hadid closes the Versace Fall 2021 Ready-to-Wear show. SuppliedGigi Hadid closes the Versace Fall 2021 Ready-to-Wear show. Supplied
Updated 06 March 2021

Gigi Hadid opens and closes Versace Fall 2021 show

Gigi Hadid closes the Versace Fall 2021 Ready-to-Wear show. Supplied

DUBAI: Gigi Hadid is officially back on the runway. Almost six months after giving birth to her baby girl with Zayn Malik, the Palestinian-Dutch model made her triumphant catwalk return on Friday, walking on the runway of the Versace Fall 2021 show at the Milan Congress Center alongside her younger sister Bella.

The 25-year-old opened the show wearing a long, black overcoat, midriff-baring corset, a short skirt and a pair of chunky platform hiking boots. The look was completed with brand new red hair, that the new mother says was inspired by Netflix series “The Queen’s Gambit.” 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Gigi Hadid (@gigihadid)

She changed into a printed mini dress, accessorized with tights, platform shoes and a wide belt for her second look. Then closed out the event in a sheer long-sleeve black gown covered in a subtle monogram motif. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Gigi Hadid (@gigihadid)

On Instagram, Gigi shared some footage from the show and wrote: “Opening & closing @versace is always an honor and was the best ‘comeback.’ Mostly just lucky to be healthy, working, and in a safe/tested environment to hug so many I’ve missed like family this past year. Thank you to everyone who made this possible, especially my Italian Taurus queen.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Gigi Hadid (@gigihadid)

Meanwhile, her younger sister Bella also made three appearances on the pre-filmed runway. First, she turned heads in a cropped bustier, skater skirt, black bandana and monogram gloves before changing into a purple pleated dress with matching printed tights and satin platform heels. For her final turn down the runway, she wore a slinky printed mini dress.

The Milan Fashion Week event marked the sister duo’s first runway appearance together since Miu Miu’s Fall 2020 show last March.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Bella (@bellahadid)

The virtual pre-recorded show aired on YouTube amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Supermodels Irina Shayk and Vittoria Ceretti also strutted down the pre-filmed runway in the Italian fashion house’s luxurious winter offerings.


What We Are Wearing Today: Foulard

What We Are Wearing Today: Foulard
Photo/Supplied
Updated 06 March 2021

What We Are Wearing Today: Foulard

What We Are Wearing Today: Foulard
  • Foulard has other collections of hijab outfits that combine modesty and sophistication, such as kimonos, turbans, bucket hats, hijab accessories, extenders, neck covers and sleeves

Foulard is a Saudi brand offering modern hand-embroidered scarfs for hijab. Its collections are inspired by women’s beauty, a reflection of simplicity and femininity.
Its products — foulard is the French word for scarf —are made of two layers from a choice of chiffon, cotton, voile and silk, with designs by Sara Rayess, who founded the business since 2011. Each collection is inspired by a theme reflected in the embroidery and color of the scarfs. One of the most interesting is Asrar, inspired by the mysteries of space and the navigation stars in the night sky. Each scarf in this collection is embroidered with elements from the galaxy such as the sun, constellations, and the crescent moon.
Foulard also has other collections of hijab outfits that combine modesty and sophistication, such as kimonos, turbans, bucket hats, hijab accessories, extenders, neck covers and sleeves.
The brand offers worldwide shipping services, including the GCC, the UK, the US, and Australia. Products are available at Foulard’s website, foulard.store, and at Homegrown Market and MIRA Y MANO in Jeddah.


Stitch in time: Saudi fashion dresses for the future

Stitch in time: Saudi fashion dresses for the future
The Saudi Cup showcased traditional outfits, with the Ministry of Culture’s fashion commission encouraging a dress code that required racegoers to highlight their heritage. (Supplied)
Updated 06 March 2021

Stitch in time: Saudi fashion dresses for the future

Stitch in time: Saudi fashion dresses for the future
  • Traditional wear gets a modern makeover as designers keep the past alive

JEDDAH: As Saudi Arabia sets out to introduce its culture, history and social life to a global audience, fashion is finding it has a key role to play in the Kingdom’s “brand strategy.”

Traditional wear proudly worn by both Saudis and expats at the recent Saudi Cup showed how age-old cultural styles could find new life in a contemporary setting.
While fashions can reflect a specific era, they also can act as a transition to the future, with fabrics, cuts, motifs and embroidery designs, and even colors and layers, keeping the story alive.
The Saudi Cup showcased traditional outfits, with the Ministry of Culture’s fashion commission encouraging a dress code that required racegoers to highlight their heritage, and designers to showcase their exclusive works, mixing the contemporary with the old.
Although Western outfits dominate the world fashion market, Saudi Arabia is choosing to stay connected with its traditional dress.
Saudi designers are constantly introducing new trends in the way outfits are made or worn, finding inspiration in age-old styles or seeking to bring the traditional clothing of a region into the present.

HIGHLIGHTS

• Although Western outfits dominate the world fashion market, Saudi Arabia is choosing to stay connected with its traditional dress.

• Saudi designers are constantly introducing new trends in the way outfits are made or worn, finding inspiration in age-old styles or seeking to bring the traditional clothing of a region into the present.

• Mohammed Khoja, a fashion designer who uses traditional approaches in his contemporary work, believes that his collections help shed light on cultural elements that appeal to both local and international audiences. 

• International events, from Eid celebrations at Saudi missions across the globe to overseas university students celebrating an occasion, allow Saudis to don traditional clothing to represent their homeland.

• Omaima Kindassa, a Saudi designer and owner of a contemporary heritage boutique, said that events such as the Saudi Cup allowed Saudis to represent their own region and culture, as well as show the Kingdom’s rich heritage and diverse culture to the world.

• Princess Nourah Al-Faisal, the designer behind Nuun Jewels, hoped to represent the historical beauty and color of traditional Saudi clothing in a way that encouraged people to embrace and celebrate their culture.

Mohammed Khoja, a fashion designer who uses traditional approaches in his contemporary work, said: “Since the beginning of my fashion design career, cultural elements have appealed to me. I am particularly driven by being able to contribute in documenting and potentially giving cultural elements more importance.”
Khoja believes that his collections help shed light on cultural elements that appeal to both local and international audiences.

Traditional wear proudly worn by both Saudis and expats showed how age-old cultural styles could find new life in a contemporary setting.

The same elements have also helped him identify with his own contemporary identity, he said.
Omaima Kindassa, a Saudi designer and owner of a contemporary heritage boutique, said that events such as the Saudi Cup allowed Saudis to represent their own region and culture, as well as show the Kingdom’s rich heritage and diverse culture to the world.
“I’ve been designing and modernizing traditional Saudi wear for 10 years,” Kindassa told Arab News. “Now many younger designers are pursuing that as well because they have fallen in love with our heritage.”
She added: “If the current generation were to wear traditional clothes, they would find them overbearing and heavy, especially accessory-embellished designs and those adorned by stones. Modernizing these outfits makes them relevant to today’s generation and ensures our tradition keeps pace with fashion.”

The Saudi Cup showcased traditional outfits, with the Ministry of Culture’s fashion commission encouraging a dress code that required racegoers to highlight their heritage, and designers to showcase their exclusive works, mixing the contemporary with the old. (Supplied)

Kindassa specializes in traditional wear from the Kingdom’s regions but also modern clothing “that tell tales of the long past.”
“Each region offers its own rich heritage through its designs, from the geometric elegant shapes, the vibrant colors, the embroidery — it looks like a painting to admire,” she said.
International events, from Eid celebrations at Saudi missions across the globe to overseas university students celebrating an occasion, allow Saudis to don traditional clothing to represent their homeland.
Princess Nourah Al-Faisal, the designer behind Nuun Jewels, told Arab News that the Saudi Cup was a “great opportunity to present the variety, regionality and beauty that is Saudi culture.”


She was brought in as a consultant for the project, a link between the Saudi Cup and the Ministry of Culture, “to curate the event in terms of looks and feel.”
Princess Nourah said the idea to promote traditional Saudi fashion was not hers, but came from Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.
The princess hoped to represent the historical beauty and color of traditional Saudi clothing in a way that encouraged people to embrace and celebrate their culture. She also wanted people to take ownership of their heritage, and see designers and communities using it as inspiration for future designs.
“So not just reproducing traditional cultural dress, but also taking it as a point of reference and moving forward into the future, recreating it, developing it and having fun with it by creating something completely new,” she said.
Impressed with the outcome, she hopes to build on this momentum where people celebrate culture every day.
“There are a number of entities within Saudi Arabia, organizations that are all about preserving our heritage; things like regional embroidery, jewelry, costumes, and really making sure that they’re archiving it, whether through photographs or through the actual pieces. I think that is something that we have been working on as a nation either in the private sector or the public sector for a while,” she said.

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Lebanese jewelry maker Danya Jabre on her fun, funky homegrown brand

Lebanese jewelry maker Danya Jabre on her fun, funky homegrown brand
Updated 05 March 2021

Lebanese jewelry maker Danya Jabre on her fun, funky homegrown brand

Lebanese jewelry maker Danya Jabre on her fun, funky homegrown brand

DUBAI: Danya Jabre has reached a stage in her life where she can look back and tell herself that she has done it all. But she has now settled enjoying what she loves most.

A mother, grandmother, and entrepreneur, Jabre fled her native Lebanon following the Israeli invasion in 1982, making her way to England first, and since living in the US, Canada, and France.

Along with her background in graphic design, all of her experiences and travels feed in one way or another into her fun and quirky fine-jewelry brand, The Twist.

“All my life, I used to plan things. They start and they fall apart,” she tells Arab News. But The Twist, which she started in 2014, looks like it’s here to stay.

Jabre’s fascination with jewelry began at an early age. Her mother returned from a trip to Hong Kong with a book on precious stones and their properties, she says: “I was nine! Why would a nine-year-old be interested in reading about a stone?”

But her mother also brought back some rough stones, which instantly sparked a desire in Jabre to hold and examine them, particularly in natural light.

Another distinct memory she shares is of her time spent in London’s punk scene of the 1980s, buying zipper earrings from King’s Road — a center of youth culture that she found fascinating.

The Twist’s first designs, set in gold and silver, were inspired by emojis that had become widely popular through Blackberry Messenger chats — a thing of the past. It was this collection that started it all, which is why it’s still Jabre’s favorite. “It brought me good luck,” she says. “It’s also happy. When I wear it, it’s a conversation starter and I get a lot of reactions from people.”

Another eye-catching collection came along soon after. “Happiness Therapy” consists of humorous necklaces on which hang colorful studded ‘happy’ pills. “It was based on my kids telling me to take a chill pill,” she says. On her website she writes of this collection: “The ultimate lesson that I learned through life is that humor eases difficult situations and makes everything better.” Even the packaging stands out; it resembles a medicine box, and contains the description: “Fast-acting, long-lasting.”

More recently, Jabre has designed larger statement pieces that still convey that pop-culture feel, such as her unique Chinese fortune cookie necklace, which hides a secret paper message and her ‘Popcorn Love’ ring, topped with shiny Mikimoto pearls disguised as pieces of popcorn.

But beyond that layer of joy and creativity, there is one particular collection for which she has a soft spot. When the Lebanese protested en masse against the government in October 2019, she decided to create “Lebanon in my Heart” — which consists of a map of Lebanon, the iconic clinched fist of the revolution, and a cedar tree with the ‘nazar’ symbol (believed to ward off the evil eye).

“I was on the streets at 3 a.m., 4 a.m., from October to February, believing that we can (make) this change,” she recalls. “It’s a very emotional subject. I’m emotionally drained by Lebanon and I still haven’t recovered.”

Like many other small businesses, The Twist has been through a tough period because of the COVID-19 pandemic. And being based in crises-stricken Lebanon has only exacerbated that. But Jabre remains optimistic, and is planning to amp her company’s digital presence.

Needless to say, Jabre gets a kick out of creating her pieces, but it’s the connection that she has built with people that brings her the most joy.

“I love to be creative,” she says. “With my clients, the relationship is not about selling. I follow up with them, asking them how they like their pieces. Some of them end up telling me their life stories. I have a personal relationship with my clients and it’s very encouraging.”


Louis Vuitton brings rare diamonds to Dubai

Louis Vuitton brings rare diamonds to Dubai
Updated 04 March 2021

Louis Vuitton brings rare diamonds to Dubai

Louis Vuitton brings rare diamonds to Dubai

DUBAI: French luxury brand Louis Vuitton is bringing two rare diamonds for the first time in the region by showcasing them at the Dubai Mall in the UAE.

The fashion house’s display, which runs until March 8, will display the “Sewelo,” the 1,758-carat rough diamond considered the second-largest ever discovered.

Discovered in April 2019 at the Karowe mine in Botswana, the baseball-sized gem got its name after a competition among Botswana citizens, with “Sewelo” which means “rare find” in Setswana, the winning entry.

“Sewelo” means “rare find” in Setswana. (AFP)

The second stone is the “Sethunya,” which is estimated to be over a billion years old.

The 549-carat gemstone is distinguished by its purity, high color and high luster.

Visitors will also find on show pieces from the Riders of the Knights collection, which is a homage to medieval heroines.