HIGHLIGHTS from Sherin Guirguis’ ‘Bint al Nil’

Sherin Guirguis ‘Here I Have Returned.’ (Supplied)
Updated 07 February 2019

HIGHLIGHTS from Sherin Guirguis’ ‘Bint al Nil’

DUBAI: Sherin Guirguis’ “Bint al Nil” is one of two exhibitions chosen to open the Tahrir Cultural Center at the American University in Cairo this month, which runs until February 28.

‘Here I Have Returned’ (2018)
LA-based, Luxor-born artist Sherin Guirguis has created a body of work intended to honor Doria Shafik, the pioneering Egyptian feminist who founded the Bint Al Nil Movement, which was instrumental in gaining Egyptian women the right to vote.

‘Storming Parliament I’ (2018)
One of a pair of paintings whose paper patterns echo the architecture of the gates outside Egypt’s parliament building. Guirguis has partially covered them in swathes of indigo-blue ink, mirroring the Nile. The title refers to a march on parliament led by Shafik in 1951, leading more than 1,500 women in protest against male dominance in politics.

‘Azbakeya (Will You Welcome Me This Time)’ (2018)
The background pattern of this piece reflects the latticework on the fences around Cairo’s Azbakeya Gardens — the scene of Shafik’s first public address. In a press release for Guirguis’ similar recent exhibit in the US, the artist’s work was described as “crucial, because she is … bringing awareness to histories that will likely fade away.”

 


‘Noura’s Dream’ becomes nightmare dilemma in this raw tale

Hend Sabry plays the lead role in ‘Noura’s Dream.’ (Supplied)
Updated 16 October 2019

‘Noura’s Dream’ becomes nightmare dilemma in this raw tale

CHENNAI: Hinde Boujemaa’s “Noura’s Dream,” which premiered at the recent Toronto International Film Festival and later featured at El Gouna Film Festival, saw the movie’s protagonist, Hend Sabry (Noura), clinch best actress award at the latter.

The director, who also wrote the script, tackles an unusual dilemma for a woman being pulled in three different directions by her husband, lover and three young children, two of them girls.

It is certainly not an easy task to lead a story such as this – emotionally complicated and set in Tunisia – to a closure.

In an interview with Variety, Boujemaa said: “There have been movies about adultery, but very few of them have been wholly empathetic to the woman. There’s often a kind of moral judgement attached. I wanted to make a film without any hint of moralizing.”

“Noura’s Dream” opens with a romantic scene. Working in a prison laundry, she is seen on her phone talking to her lover, handsome garage mechanic Lassaad (Hakim Boumsaoudi), and the two are all set to marry, her divorce just days away.

Her husband, Jamel (Lotfi Abdelli), is in jail having been caught committing petty crimes but when he is freed early after a presidential pardon, things get messy.

The director tackles an unusual dilemma for a woman being pulled in three different directions by her husband, lover and three young children. (Supplied) 

Boujemaa’s film has the feel of a Ken Loach (British director) movie, with its take on the predicament of the working class. There is a certain raw quality about “Noura’s Dream,” devoid of the polish and psychological complexities of “Marriage Story” (screened at Venice), in which auteur Noah Baumbach portrays the pain of a marital split with a degree of levity and sophistication.

A similar approach and treatment cannot be taken with Noura’s story, which is set in a very different kind of social environment that gives little freedom or equality to a woman. Take, for instance, the scene in which Noura’s defense lawyer, a woman, makes her client feel small and guilty, reminding her of the injustice and harm a split would do to her children.

Boujemaa’s film has the feel of a Ken Loach (British director) movie. (Supplied) 

Sabry brings to the fore the quandary of Noura, who is completely lost.

Should she go ahead with the divorce and marry Lassaad, a union that could mean abandoning her children who need their mother? Or should she stick with her wayward husband? There are no easy answers.