Nearly 2.6 million residence, labor violators arrested across Saudi Arabia

About 43,033 people were arrested while trying to cross the border into Saudi Arabia. (SPA)
Updated 10 February 2019

Nearly 2.6 million residence, labor violators arrested across Saudi Arabia

  • Immediate penalties were imposed against 395,916 offenders; 354,846 were transferred to their respective diplomatic missions to obtain travel documents

JEDDAH: Nearly 2.6 million violators of residency, work and border security systems have been arrested in a year-long roundup, according to an official report.
Since the campaign began in November 2017 the total number of offenders was 2,584,307, which included 2,012,832 for violating residency regulations, 395,346 for labor violations and 176,129 for border violations, the Saudi Press Agency (SPA) reported.
The report said that 43,033 people were arrested while trying to cross the border into the Kingdom, 51 percent of whom were Yemeni citizens, 46 percent were Ethiopians and 3 percent were of other nationalities.
Some 1,878 people were arrested for trying to cross the border into neighboring countries and 3,363 were arrested for involvement in transporting and harboring those violators.
Immediate penalties were imposed against 395,916 offenders; 354,846 were transferred to their respective diplomatic missions to obtain travel documents; 441,550 were transferred to complete their travel reservations; and 655,578 were deported.


Dr. Lilak Al-Safadi, president of the Saudi Electronic University

Updated 05 July 2020

Dr. Lilak Al-Safadi, president of the Saudi Electronic University

Saudi Education Minister Dr. Hamad bin Mohammed Al-Asheikh recently announced the appointment of Dr. Lilak Al-Safadi as president of the Saudi Electronic University. She becomes the first woman to chair a Saudi university that includes both male and female students.

She has worked as executive director for more than 20 years in business development, business consulting and strategic leadership, and accumulated experience in project management.

She has also published more than 50 research papers and articles on research topics such as e-commerce and artificial and commercial intelligence.

Al-Safadi was the vice president and national technology officer at Microsoft and is a faculty member at the King Saud University, Riyadh.

She also worked as a consultant to the governor of the General Authority for Small and Medium Enterprises (Monshaat), and a consultant to the vice presidency for planning, quality and development at the Saudi Electronic University. 

Al-Safadi is a graduate from the University of Wollongong, Australia with a Ph.D. in computer science which she completed in 2002; she majored in software engineering and completed her master’s in computer science in 1995. 

In a telephone interview with Al-Ekhbariya channel, Al-Safadi said that her appointment had many implications not only for empowering women and enhancing their role, but also as an indication of the Kingdom’s commitment to women’s equity at all levels, including equal opportunities in leadership and competition.