South Sudan to return to pre-war oil production levels ‘by 2020’

The country has one of the largest reserves of crude oil in the region. (Reuters)
Updated 11 February 2019

South Sudan to return to pre-war oil production levels ‘by 2020’

  • The world’s youngest country, which split from Sudan in 2011, has one of the largest reserves of crude in sub-Saharan Africa, only a third of which have been explored so far

GREATER NOIDA, India: South Sudan will return to producing more than 350,000 barrels of crude per day by the middle of 2020, up from current levels of just over 140,000 barrels per day (bpd) currently, the country’s oil minister said on Sunday.
Production is expected to rise to 270,000 bpd by the end of 2019, Oil Minister Ezekiel Lul Gatkuoth told Reuters. He was speaking on the sidelines of the Petrotech conference in Greater Noida, a satellite city of India’s capital New Delhi.
The world’s youngest country, which split from Sudan in 2011, has one of the largest reserves of crude in sub-Saharan Africa, only a third of which have been explored so far. The country lost many oilfields to a civil war that broke out two years after its independence. A September peace agreement is largely holding.
“By the end of the year, block 3 and 7 will be hitting 180,000 bpd, blocks 1, 2 and 4 will be producing 70,000 bpd, and block 5A will be producing 20,000 bpd,” Gatkuoth said.
“We used to produce 350,000 to 400,000 bpd. We expect to go back to those levels by the middle of next year,” he said.
South Sudan has signed a preliminary agreement with Russia’s Zarubezhneft for exploring some of the blocks, Gatkuoth said.
“They are interested in block B1, B2, E1 and E2. We will be working to see where they are likely to be interested in the most,” he said.
South Africa, which has committed to investing $1 billion in the country, would collaborate with South Sudan on the construction of pipelines and a new refinery along the border with Ethiopia, the minister said.
“We have agreed to build a refinery on the border of Ethiopia, we have already signed an agreement with Ethiopia to offtake refined products,” Gatkuoth said.
Land-locked South Sudan is looking to boost its export options as it looks beyond its neighbor Sudan, the minister said: “We have new blocks in the southern part of South Sudan, oil from which will be exported to East Africa (through the new pipelines).”
American oil majors such as Exxon Mobil and Chevron showed interest in investing in South Sudan, but are currently not interested because of the conflict, he said.
“We have been approaching Exxon officials, and I will be meeting them in Houston next month,” he said.


Saudi Arabia opens new logistics zone in Jeddah

Updated 13 October 2019

Saudi Arabia opens new logistics zone in Jeddah

  • The Al-Khomra zone extends over 2.3m square meters in Jeddah
  • It will support activities around shipping, freight distribution and transport of goods

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia launched on Sunday a new logistics zone open to private investors in the Red Sea port city of Jeddah, as part of a wider industrial initiative to diversify the economy away from oil and create jobs for Saudis.
The Al-Khomra zone — which will support activities around shipping, freight distribution and transport of goods — extends over 2.3 million square meters in Jeddah, home to one of the Kingdom’s largest ports.
As the biggest logistics zone in the country, it hopes to turn Saudi Arabia into a global logistics hub and create 10,000 direct jobs, said Minister of Transport Nabeel Al-Amudi.
It is part of the broader National Industrial Development and Logistics Program (NIDLP), which aims to create 1.6 million jobs and attract investments worth SR 1.6 trillion ($427 billion) over the next decade. Of that, SR 135 billion is earmarked for investment in the logistics sector.
Under its ambitious reform strategy, the Kingdom plans to have the private sector operate much of its transport infrastructure, including airports and sea ports, with the government keeping a role as regulator.
Details of what the government plans to offer investors in Al-Khomra were not disclosed, but the Saudi Ports Authority  (Mawani) said the zone would offer opportunities to investors on a lease basis.
“Investment in the logistics zone in Al-Khomra and other ports will total SR 7 billion,” said Saad Al-Khalb, president of the Saudi Ports Authority.
Al-Khomra joins other logistics zones in the `kingdom — the King Abdullah Economic City north of Jeddah has its own port and offers logistics investments and NEOM, a mega project announced in 2017, has plans for a logistics zone.
Over a decade ago, the Saudi government spent $30 billion to build six economic cities across the Kingdom to diversify the economy, create jobs for young Saudis and attract foreign investment, though many of the projects have failed to achieve expected results.
After decades of spending on development projects, the government has made attracting greater foreign investment a cornerstone of its Vision 2030 plan.