HIGHLIGHTS from ‘Personal Revolutions’

'Book of Mathematics' by Hiba Al Ansari. (Supplied)
Updated 18 February 2019

HIGHLIGHTS from ‘Personal Revolutions’

DUBAI: ‘Personal Revolutions’ is showing at Alserkal Avenue in Dubai from March 9 – April 8.

“Untitled”

Leila Nseir

“Personal Revolutions” is a group exhibition curated by the Atassi Foundation. On display will be works from Syrian female artists. “There has never been a dedicated exploration of the art scene relating to women artists in Syria,” said foundation founder Mouna Atassi. “(The exhibition) aims to fill this void … even if only to scratch the surface.”

“A Book of Mathematics”

Hiba Al-Ansari

This mixed-media installation was created by Germany-based artist Hiba Al-Ansari. It is based on a textbook she found in the rubble of a recently destroyed house in Kafrenbel in northern Syria and took back to Munich with her, and is, she has said, an exploration of the moment of explosion, designed to show their “absurdity and illogicality.”

 

“QR Patterns”

Sulafa Hijazi

Hijazi left Syria in 2013, having been a vocal critic of the political and social oppression there. She now lives and works in Berlin. Her digital artwork often focuses on carpets and geometric patterns. In the press release for the show, Mouna Atassi wrote: “To know a society and understand it better, one must look into the role and dynamism of women.”

 


Little Mix’s Jade Thirlwall: ‘I was bullied for being Arab’

The singer's maternal grandfather is Yemeni and maternal grandmother Egyptian. (Getty)
Updated 05 June 2020

Little Mix’s Jade Thirlwall: ‘I was bullied for being Arab’

DUBAI: Girl group Little Mix’s star Jade Thirlwall has opened up about bullying she experienced as a teenager due to her Arab roots.

Speaking on the BBC “No Country For Young Women” podcast, the 2011 “X-Factor” finalist, whose maternal grandfather is Yemeni and maternal grandmother Egyptian, said that she felt “ashamed” of her background. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

oh hey it’s me shamelessly plugging #BreakUpSong for the 1847th time via a thirst trap pic

A post shared by jade amelia thirlwall (@jadethirlwall) on

“When I went to secondary school, I was literally one of three people of color in the school,” the 27-year-old music sensation, whose father is British, said.

“I remember one time I got pinned down in the toilets and they put a bindi spot on my forehead; it was horrific.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

look in the notebook.

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“I have constantly had this inner battle of not really knowing who I am, or where I fit in, or what community I fit into,” she said.

The singer recalled that she would put white powder on her face “to whiten” herself when performing on stage at her school.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

finding a new love for my natural hair⚡️

A post shared by jade amelia thirlwall (@jadethirlwall) on

After joining Little Mix, she “subconsciously” did not want to talk about her heritage for fear of being disliked.

“I think because I was bullied quite badly in school because of the color of my skin and for being Arab, I wasn’t very proud of who I was,” Thirlwall explained.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

category is: 80s realness @madison_phipps

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“I would hate to talk about my race and heritage and not say the right things,” she added.