Personality on the morning commute: Australia’s emoji license plates

Sample customized emoji plates shared on social media by Queensland state’s official license plate vendor, Personalized Plates Queensland (PPQ). (Via Instagram)
Updated 21 February 2019

Personality on the morning commute: Australia’s emoji license plates

  • Queensland's largest automotive organization and some residents welcomed the digital addition
  • But some think it is costly and could attract unwanted attention

BRISBANE, Australia: Motorists in northeastern Australia can soon have their personality permanently stamped on their vehicles with the option of an emoji added to their license plates.
It will be positive vibes only on the morning commute after a Queensland firm announced that from March drivers can add the smiling, winking, laughing out loud, heart-eyed and sunglasses emoji to their plates.
The state’s largest automotive organization has welcomed the digital addition.
“For quite some time we’ve seen you can support your favorite team or town with a symbol on your number plate and using an emoji is no different,” Royal Automobile Club of Queensland spokesperson Rebecca Michaels told AFP.
Queensland resident Laura McKee has already put her order in for the new look plates.
“It’s a bit of fun, if this brightens up someone’s day while their stuck in traffic, then so be it,” she told AFP.
With a cost of between Aus$100 ($70) and $500 per plate, Queensland local Aroha Liebhart isn’t a fan, and thinks the emojis could attract unwanted attention.
“The cost pushes them out of reach for so many people, no one I know will be purchasing them when they’re so expensive,” she told AFP.
“I live in a high crime area, I do believe this will entice people to target the cars who do have them.”
But resident Mark Edwards wants to see more options for drivers, to better express a driver’s changing moods.
“They should be interchangeable so when you’re tired you can warn drivers, or when you’re a little angry you can swap them over,” he told AFP.


Singapore baggage handler jailed for swapping luggage tags

Updated 12 November 2019

Singapore baggage handler jailed for swapping luggage tags

  • Bags belonged to passengers transiting through Changi and using Singapore Airlines and its regional wing SilkAir
  • Changi handled nearly 65.6 million passengers last year

SINGAPORE: A Singaporean baggage handler has been jailed for 20 days for swapping tags on nearly 300 suitcases at the city-state’s airport, causing them to end up at wrong destinations around the world.
Tay Boon Keh, 66, had pleaded guilty to charges of swapping the tags on 286 bags at Changi Airport, one of the world’s busiest hubs.
He made the swaps between November 2016 and February 2017 out of “frustration and anger” after his request for additional staff at his work section was ignored, a district court heard.
Suitcases originally bound for various parts of the world, including Perth, Manila, Frankfurt, London and San Francisco, were affected, according to court documents.
The bags belonged to passengers transiting through Changi and using Singapore Airlines and its regional wing SilkAir.
Tay was suffering from major depressive disorder when he committed the offenses, the court heard.
But state prosecutors said evidence presented at a hearing showed his condition “did not contribute significantly to his commission of the offenses” as he continued to have control over his actions.
Prosecutor Thiam Jia Min said the swapping could have caused “potentially, even serious or fatal, consequences” as some passengers could have been left without medications.
Changi handled nearly 65.6 million passengers last year.