Elon Musk says next vehicle to be unveiled later this month

In this file photo taken on December 18, 2018 Elon Musk, co-founder and chief executive officer of Tesla Inc., speaks during an unveiling event for the Boring Company Hawthorne test tunnel in Hawthorne, south of Los Angeles, California. (AFP)
Updated 04 March 2019
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Elon Musk says next vehicle to be unveiled later this month

  • Musk recently told investors that the Model Y will share about 75 percent of the same components as the Model 3

CALIFORNIA: Tesla CEO Elon Musk announced on Twitter that the company’s next vehicle will be unveiled March 14.
The vehicle, currently dubbed “Model Y,” is expected to be an SUV with many of the same underpinnings as its lower-cost sedan, the Model 3.
Tesla has an avid fan base for its cars but it has struggled with production issues. Musk insists the company has learned its lesson and that by using some overlapping technology it can get the product to market faster. Musk recently told investors that the Model Y will share about 75 percent of the same components as the Model 3.
The company has been trying to move beyond its niche as a maker of luxury cars with a wider array of new products.


Beijing ponders support for petrol-electric hybrids

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Updated 13 July 2019

Beijing ponders support for petrol-electric hybrids

  • Hybrid cars sold in China include versions of Toyota’s Corolla, Levin and Camry sedans, and versions of Honda’s Accord and CR-V

BEIJING: China is considering re-classifying petrol-electric hybrid vehicles so they get more favorable treatment than all-petrol or diesel counterparts under clean car rules, making it easier for automakers to meet environment quotas and offer more choice.
Global hybrid leaders Toyota Motor Corp. and Honda Motor Co. Ltd. would be among the biggest beneficiaries of such change, which could allow them to make more hybrids and less of the more costly all-electric vehicles, experts said, after reviewing the draft policy proposal published on Tuesday by the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology.
China has some of the world’s strictest rules regarding the production of greenhouse gas-emitting vehicles, as it battles unhealthy levels of air pollution in its crowded cities.
In the draft proposal, hybrids would still be considered fossil-fueled but re-classified as “low fuel consumption passenger vehicles.” Significantly, the number of negative points incurred for making hybrids will be less than for traditional vehicles.
The proposed change came as a surprise, some experts and industry officials said, because the government has never given any preferential treatment for hybrid technology. Previously, the government offered subsidies for, for instance, the purchase of all-electric cars.
Hybrid cars sold in China include versions of Toyota’s Corolla, Levin and Camry sedans, and versions of Honda’s Accord and CR-V. Beijing-based spokesmen for both Japanese automakers declined to comment.