Egypt refers 28 to court on charges of joining Daesh, Al-Qaeda

Egyptian military forces stand around body of suicide bomber next to Coptic Orthodox Church of the Virgin Mary. (AFP/File)
Updated 25 March 2019

Egypt refers 28 to court on charges of joining Daesh, Al-Qaeda

  • Egyptian officials said only 17 of the 28 suspects are actually in custody
  • They said the suspects were planning to conduct attacks in Egypt

CAIRO: Egyptian prosecutors have referred 28 terror suspects in two separate cases to court on charges of joining local affiliates of the Daesh group and Al-Qaeda.
They said Monday the suspects were plotting attacks against security forces and the headquarters of the high state prosecution in Cairo.
They say only 17 of the 28 suspects are in custody. No date has been set for their trials. It was not clear when or where they were arrested.
A Daesh affiliate based in northern Sinai has carried out attacks across Egypt in recent years, mainly targeting security forces and the country’s Christian minority.
Egypt has been battling militants for years, but the insurgency gathered strength after the 2013 military overthrow of an elected but divisive Islamist president.


Macron slams Turkey’s aggression in Syria as ‘madness’, bewails NATO inaction

Updated 19 October 2019

Macron slams Turkey’s aggression in Syria as ‘madness’, bewails NATO inaction

  • EU Council President Donald Tusk said the halt of Turkish hostilities as demanded by the US is not a genuine cease-fire
  • He calls on Ankara to immediately stop military operations,

BRUSSELS/ANKARA: Macron critizes Turkey's aggression in Syria as "madness', bewails NATO inaction

France’s President Emmanuel Macron has bemoaned Turkey’s offensive into northern Syria as “madness” and decried NATO’s inability to react to the assault as a “serious mistake.”

“It weakens our credibility in finding partners on the ground who will be by our side and who think they will be protected in the long term. So that raises questions about how NATO functions.”

EU Council President Donald Tusk said the halt of Turkish hostilities is not a genuine cease-fire and called on Ankara to immediately stop military operations in Syria.

Dareen Khalifa, a senior Syria analyst at the International Crisis Group, said the cease-fire had unclear goals. 

There was no mention of the scope of the area that would be under Turkish control and, despite US Vice President Mike Pence referring to a 20-mile zone, the length of the zone remains ambiguous, she said.

Selim Sazak, a doctoral researcher at Brown University, believed the agreement would be implemented and the YPG would withdraw.

“The agency of the YPG is fairly limited. If the deal collapses because of the YPG, it’s actually all the better for Ankara,” he told Arab News. “What Ankara originally wanted was to take all of the belt into its control and eliminate as many of the YPG forces as possible. Instead, the YPG is withdrawing with a portion of its forces and its territory intact. Had the deal collapsed because of the YPG, Ankara would have reason to push forward, this time with much more legitimacy.”