TheFace: Lama Al-Fozan, Saudi manager

Lama Al-Fozan grew up moving around the globe as her father is a diplomat. (AN photo by Ziyad Alarfaj)
Updated 28 March 2019

TheFace: Lama Al-Fozan, Saudi manager

  • After her graduation Al-Fozan joined SAGIA, the Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority, where she worked for nine years as an advisory manager
  • Recently she became the manager of partnerships and strategic alliances at KAFD Development & Management Co.

Lama Al-Fozan grew up moving around the globe as her father is a diplomat, and received most of her basic education in several countries. She is the eldest of five children. 

She received her bachelor’s degree in English language from King Faisal University in Riyadh and holds a master’s degree in international affairs and diplomacy from the American University in Dubai, UAE. 

After her graduation Al-Fozan joined SAGIA, the Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority, where she worked for nine years as an advisory manager and was responsible for attracting foreign direct investment and guiding new investors in the Kingdom. 

Recently she became the manager of partnerships and strategic alliances at KAFD Development & Management Co., which is implementing the King Abdullah Financial District project. KAFD is envisioned as a business hub that will revive and strengthen the Kingdom’s economy.

Al-Fozan has been in this position for a month and a half, moving from her city in the Eastern Province to Riyadh to build a career in what she describes as “the greatest business hub in the country and the region.” 

“I love what I do because I can see that everything I am working on will actually come true as the strategy we are building now will come to reality and be implemented in the upcoming years,” she said. “I am proud to be a part of the team and this company and I would love to see the company grow and to see the city I that I am in grow with me.”

Al-Fozan has a keen interest in international affairs and has joined several programs. She participated at the UN’s program for young people to tackle the UN Sustainable Development Goals, the Merit360. 

“I worked with a group to develop action plans to tackle the UN’s No. 1 goal — no poverty,” she said.  

The UN’s program inspired her to co-found Talga, a Saudi-based nonprofit organization that aims to provide sustainable solutions and consultancies to developmental challenges by linking research and action.

“Talga is the name of a local tree in Asir. It symbolizes our main values which we want to celebrate with the world: Sustainability, creativity, tolerance, diversity and culture,” she said. 

Al-Fozan is also a member of the Saudi female fencing team and has participated in several championships. 

She is currently working with the Kingdom’s first Athletes’ Commission to look at any obstacles athletes in Saudi Arabia are facing. 

Al-Fozan is a part of a sports company, Master Me, where she is a regional director. Master Me supports the Kingdom’s Vision 2030 goal of promoting physical and social well-being and a healthy lifestyle by providing sports education and skills to the community.

“We are reaching out to the Saudi Olympic committee, sports authority, the Ministry of Education to produce quality and skilled talented student leaders and implement the state’s quota of leadership in sports,” she said.

“Nowadays, things are shifting to the conceptional age, which is an era that is all about ideas and creativity. It is an exciting time to be Saudi and a female and witness all these changes while trying to be a part of the transformation.” 


Worshippers flock to reopened Prophet’s Mosque for Friday prayers

Updated 06 June 2020

Worshippers flock to reopened Prophet’s Mosque for Friday prayers

MADINAH: Hundreds of thousands of worshippers attended the first Friday prayers to be held at the Prophet’s Mosque in Madinah since the gatherings were suspended to stop the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak.

The green light for the resumption of the prayer meetings came as part of a plan to gradually reopen the Kingdom’s mosques while ensuring worshippers and visitors adhered to preventive measures.

A ban on access to the Rawdah remained in place and only groups of worshippers numbering up to a maximum of 40 percent of the mosque’s capacity were being allowed entry.

Precautionary measures also included the allocation of specific doors for the entry of worshippers, the installation of thermal cameras, removal of all carpets so that prayers could be performed on the marble, sanitization of the mosque’s floors and courtyards, periodic opening of domes and canopies to ventilate the mosque, and the removal of Zamzam water containers.

The Prophet’s Mosque in Madinah will be closed after evening prayers and reopened one hour before dawn prayers. Parking lots will operate at 50 percent capacity and a media awareness campaign has been launched to highlight safety procedures at the holy site.

Medical teams have also been stationed at the main entrances to the mosque in cooperation with the Ministry of Health.

Elsewhere in the Kingdom, worshippers also flocked to perform Friday prayers at mosques amid strict health measures.

On May 31, Saudi authorities reopened all mosques for prayers, except in Makkah, as part of the Kingdom’s plan for a gradual return to normal life.

Last week the minister of Islamic affairs, dawah and guidance said that the country’s mosques were ready to welcome back worshippers, following his field trips to check that necessary preparations had been made.

All worshippers must still maintain a distance of 2 meters between rows, wear masks to enter a mosque, and Friday sermons and prayers have been limited to a maximum of 15 minutes.