Singapore Airlines grounds two 787-10s citing Rolls-Royce engine problem

Above, the first 787-10 Dreamliner built for Singapore Airlines at its final assembly facility in North Charleston, South Carolina. (Boeing)
Updated 02 April 2019

Singapore Airlines grounds two 787-10s citing Rolls-Royce engine problem

  • The jets have been removed from service pending engine replacement
  • The Trent 1000 TEN is the latest version of an engine that has had a problematic entry into service

SINGAPORE: Singapore Airlines said on Tuesday it had grounded two Boeing Co. 787-10 jets fitted with Rolls-Royce Trent 1000 TEN engines after checks of its fleet found premature blade deterioration.
The jets have been removed from service pending engine replacement, the airline said in a statement.
The Trent 1000 TEN is the latest version of an engine that has had a problematic entry into service. As of late February, Rolls-Royce said 35 787s were grounded globally due to engine blades corroding or cracking prematurely. The manufacturer said it was aiming to reduce the number to 10 by the end of the year.
In February, the company raised a Trent 1000 accounting charge to $1.03 billion (£790 million) from £554 million at the half year, contributing to a full-year operating loss of £1.16 billion. It also allocated another £100 million in cash to the problem.
Rolls-Royce said on Tuesday that since the entry into service of the Trent 1000 TEN, it had communicated to operators that the high-pressure turbine blades in the engine would have a limited life.
“Working with operators, we have been sampling a small population of the Trent 1000 TEN fleet that has flown in more arduous conditions,” the manufacturer said in a statement. “This work has shown that a small number of these engines need to have their blades replaced earlier than scheduled.”
Rolls-Royce said its engineers were already developing and testing an enhanced version of the turbine blade.
“We will now work closely with any impacted customers to deliver an accelerated program to implement the enhanced blade and to ensure that we can deliver on our Trent 1000 TEN future commitments,” the company said. “We regret any disruption this causes to airline operations.”


At Davos, innovative products point to a sustainable future

Updated 24 January 2020

At Davos, innovative products point to a sustainable future

  • A single tree that to bear 40 different types of apple

DAVOS: The World Economic Forum is not all about the fourth industrial revolution or the rise of AI.

You can also find all manner of strange and intriguing products on display from biodegradable plastic made from algae to wallpaper made from recycled corn husks.

One stand titled “How do you design a tree?” is part of a conservation effort where a single tree is designed to bear 40 different types of apple.

Another stand displays colored seaweed on a rack, showing how clothes can be dyed in a sustainable, non-chemically corrosive manner.

Propped along a large wall is Fernando Laposse’s wallpaper made of variations of purple corn husks that are reinforced with recycled cardboard and cork to create wallpaper and furniture. The husks come from corn that needs very little water and can be grown in the desert, which makes it all the more sustainable.

“This initiative helps the local economy as it brings in jobs and a resurgence of crafts and food traditions while also ensuring sustainability,” Laposse said.

Another display shows a machine that extracts pellets from a mixture of algae and starch and is used to create a thread that is the base of 3D printing. These sustainable, biodegradable plastics made from algae are being experimented with in different regions.

With the rise of deep fakes — a branch of synthetic media in which a person in an existing image or video is replaced with someone else’s likeness — another stand delivers a warning on the looming dangers of unregulated software.

The Davos forum prides itself on its sustainability, and key topics have included climate, mobility, energy and the circular economy. Everything is recyclable, and participants must download an application in order to keep up with the program and any changes — a move to cut down on paper waste.