First Abu Dhabi Bank, Abu Dhabi Islamic Bank deny merger talks

First Abu Dhabi Bank’s head office at Khalifa Business Park in Abu Dhabi. (Reuters)
Updated 04 April 2019

First Abu Dhabi Bank, Abu Dhabi Islamic Bank deny merger talks

  • Bloomberg reported that Abu Dhabi was considering merging the two lenders to create the Gulf region’s largest bank
  • With around 50 banks, the crowded UAE banking sector has been squeezed by decreased government spending and lower profit margins

ABU DHABI: Abu Dhabi Islamic Bank (ADIB) and First Abu Dhabi Bank (FAB) denied on Thursday they were in merger talks after a news report said the emirate was considering combining them.

Citing unnamed sources, Bloomberg reported on Wednesday that Abu Dhabi was considering merging the two lenders to create the Gulf region’s largest lender. First Abu Dhabi Bank, the largest lender in the United Arab Emirates, in a bourse filing said it “strongly denies the report issued by Bloomberg on the potential merger.”

“FAB currently has not entered discussions with ADIB to pursue any merger activity,” it said.

ADIB, in a separate bourse filing, said the news report was not correct and that the bank is “currently not studying for any merger or acquisition.”

There has been speculation in recent months of more possible banking tie-ups in light of the wave of consolidation sweeping Abu Dhabi.

With around 50 banks, the crowded UAE banking sector has been squeezed by decreased government spending and lower profit margins.

Abu Dhabi’s two largest banks, First Gulf Bank and National Bank of Abu Dhabi merged in 2017 to form First Abu Dhabi Bank while another three-way merger of Abu Dhabi Commercial Bank, Union National Bank and Al Hilal Bank is currently underway. Two of Abu Dhabi’s largest investment funds, Mubadala and International Petroleum Investment Company (IPIC) were also merged.


Demand issues ‘to overshadow OPEC+ supply next year’

Updated 29 October 2020

Demand issues ‘to overshadow OPEC+ supply next year’

  • Libya's rising production adding to pressure on oil markets

DUBAI: The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and its allies will have to contend with a “lot of demand issues” before raising supply in January 2021, given throughput cuts by oil refiners, the head of Saudi Aramco’s trading arm said.
OPEC and its allies plan to raise production by 2 million barrels per day (bpd) from January after record output cuts this year as the coronavirus pandemic hammered demand, taking overall reductions to about 5.7 million bpd. 

“We see stress in refining margins and see a lot of refineries either cutting their refining capacity to 50-60% or a lot of refineries closing,” Ibrahim Al-Buainain said an interview with Gulf Intelligence released on Wednesday.

“I don’t think the (refining) business is sustainable at these rates (refining margins).”

However, Chinese oil demand is likely to remain solid through the fourth quarter and into 2021 as its economy grows while the rest of the world is in negative territory, he added.

Among the uncertainties facing the oil market are rising Libyan output on the supply side and a second wave of global COVID-19 infections, especially in Europe, on the demand side, Al-Buainain said.

Complicating efforts by other OPEC members and allies to curb output, Libyan production is expected to rebound to 1 million bpd in the coming weeks.

Oil prices, meanwhile, fell over 4 percent on Wednesday as surging coronavirus infections in the US and Europe are leading to renewed lockdowns, fanning fears that the unsteady economic recovery will deteriorate.

“Crude oil is under pressure from the increase in COVID-19 cases, especially in Europe,” said Robert Yawger, director of energy futures at Mizuho in New York.

Brent futures fell $1.91, or 4.6 percent, to $39.29 a barrel, while US West Texas Intermediate crude fell $2.05, or 5.2 percent, to $37.52.

Earlier in the day Brent traded to its lowest since Oct. 2 and WTI its lowest since Oct. 5.

Futures pared losses somewhat after the US Energy Information Administration (EIA) said a bigger-than-expected 4.3 million barrels of crude oil was put into storage last week, but slightly less than industry data late Tuesday which showed a 4.6 million-barrel build.

However, crude production surged to its highest since July at 11.1 million barrels per day in a record weekly build of 1.2 million bpd, the data showed.

Gasoline demand has also been weak overall, down 10 percent from the four-week average a year ago. US consumption is recovering slowly, especially as millions of people restrict leisure travel with cases surging nationwide.