Jewellery Salon 2019 opens today, celebrates 10 years

The event act as a gateway for foreign brands to gain the attention of an exclusive Saudi clientele.
Updated 08 April 2019

Jewellery Salon 2019 opens today, celebrates 10 years

The Jeddah Hilton hall will sparkle from Monday through Thursday this week for the 10th annual Jewellery Salon 2019, a well-established jewelry exhibition in the Kingdom.
More than 50 international companies are participating in the event, showcasing luxurious and well-crafted ornaments to an exclusive clientele.
Held under the patronage of Princess Latifa bint Saad, the annual event will offer a wide array of ornaments ranging from gold, silver, gem-studded jewelry to diamond and precious stones for visitors to explore.
The CSR (corporate social responsibility) strategy of this year’s event is in line with Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s Vision 2030 to empower women and Saudi youth.
To celebrate 10 years of Jewellery Salon, organizers have invited 10 of the “most influential” Saudi women to share their success stories. Additionally, some of the country’s top female jewelers have also been invited to participate in the exhibition.
Since its inauguration in 2010, the event has provided a platform for young Saudi jewelry designers, helping them launch their own brands. Several successful local jewelry brands started their journey from Jewellery Salon, including Lillian Ismael, Tasneem Al-Tahini and Lina Al-Kherji.
The show running from April 8 to 11th in Jeddah, will open at 4 p.m. and close at 10 p.m.
The second edition of the event, which is organized by Sunaidi Expo & Conferences, this year will be held in Riyadh’s Al-Faisaliah Hotel from April 15 to 18th under the patronage of Prince Sultan bin Saud bin Mohammad.
The event is being held alongside fine watchmaking exhibition Salon des Grandes Complications (SDGC 2019).
Saudi Arabia has the highest concentration of wealthy families in the MENA region. As such the events act as a gateway for foreign brands to gain the attention of an exclusive Saudi clientele.


Whale shark hot spot in Red Sea offers new insights

An international team of KAUST researchers studied whale shark movement patterns near the Shib Habil reef (Arabic for ‘Rope Reef’), a known whale shark hotspot in the Red Sea on the Saudi Arabian coast.
Updated 18 November 2019

Whale shark hot spot in Red Sea offers new insights

According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), whale sharks are considered endangered, which means the species has suffered a population decline of more than 50 percent in the past three generations. The whale shark is only two classifications from being extinct. Improvements and conservation efforts are in place, but there is still a long way to
go to protect these gentle underwater giants.
An international team of researchers, led by marine scientists at King Abdullah University for Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia and including researchers from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) in the US, has performed an extensive study of whale shark movement and residency using a combination of three scientific techniques: Visual census, acoustic monitoring and satellite telemetry.
Their six-year study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, tracked long-term whale shark movement patterns near the Shib Habil reef (Arabic for “Rope Reef”), a known whale shark hotspot in the Red Sea. The team monitored a total of 84 different sharks over a six-year period, and their results shed light on whale shark behaviors,
which could help to inform conservation efforts.
“The study takes years of passive acoustic monitoring data and combines it with previously published visual census and satellite telemetry data from the same individual sharks. The combined dataset is used to characterize the aggregation’s seasonality, spatial distribution, and patterns of dispersal,” said Dr. Michael Berumen, director of the Red Sea Research Center and professor of marine science at KAUST.

HIGHLIGHT

An international team of researchers, led by marine scientists at King Abdullah University for Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia and including researchers from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) in the US, has performed an extensive study of whale shark movement and residency.

They found the aggregation to be highly seasonal, with sharks being most abundant in April and May, and that many of the sharks returned to the hot spot regularly year after year. The study also shows roughly equal numbers of male and female sharks using the site, something that could be unique to Shib Habil. These characteristics indicate that this site may serve an important function for the wider Indian Ocean population of this rare and endangered species.
“Using the combined dataset, we can show somewhat conclusively that the aggregation meets all of the criteria of a shark nursery. This is particularly relevant given that Shib Habil is the only site in the Indian Ocean to regularly attract large numbers of juvenile females. Growing late-stage adolescents of both sexes into full adulthood is critical for sustaining a species. Management of critical habitats like Shib Habil and other aggregations will likely be vital for future whale shark conservation,” said KAUST graduate Dr. Jesse Cochran, lead author of the study.
There is a combination of factors contributing to the decrease of whale shark populations world-wide, including targeted fishing, bycatch losses due to fisheries, vessel strikes from boat traffic, marine debris, and pollution.