Film review: Childhood fantasy adventure not quite what dreams are made of

Film review: Childhood fantasy adventure not quite what dreams are made of
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The film stars Samuel L. Jackson as a rather quirky salesman. (Supplied)
Film review: Childhood fantasy adventure not quite what dreams are made of
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The film is directed by Brie Larson, who plays the lead role. (Supplied)
Updated 10 April 2019

Film review: Childhood fantasy adventure not quite what dreams are made of

Film review: Childhood fantasy adventure not quite what dreams are made of
  • Now on Netflix, “Unicorn Store” resembles the fanciful cinema of 100 years ago and looks utterly magical
  • The film is directed by “Captain Marvel” star Brie Larson

CHENNAI: In a land of make-believe, “Unicorn Store” is a bold fantasy adventure that proves a child lives on in every adult.

Written by Samantha McIntyre and directed by Brie Larson, who plays the lead role of Kit, the film tells the story of a woman who receives a mysterious invitation that would fulfill her childhood dreams.

Now on Netflix, “Unicorn Store” resembles the fanciful cinema of 100 years ago and looks utterly magical.

McIntyre and Larson introduce a unicorn, the mythical one-horned, horse-like creature that has been part of European folklore down the ages, and for big kid Kit the animal becomes an obsession.

Caught in the drudgery of a firm trying to sell vacuum cleaners and between her possessive parents, she chances upon a unicorn store run by a strange salesman (Samuel L. Jackson) who promises Kit can have the animal, provided she can take care of it.

It is an interesting concept but unfortunately the movie wastes a lot of time leading up to Kit’s discovery of the shop, and much of it is verbose and unexciting.

The film sets are glittering with lots of colored lights and streamers, but these add little to add substance to proceedings. The end of the movie too, appears so tame that it robs it of the fantasy which was carefully built from the start.

However, Larson is marvelous as the wide-eyed girl searching for that elusive unicorn which she has been dreaming of since she was a child.

The actress-director demonstrated how effortlessly she could play a deeply distressed woman in “Room” (2015) ­– where a mother and her son are held captive for years in an enclosed space – and gives an unbelievable makeover as a dreamer in “Unicorn Store.”

However, her helming ability is not quite compatible with her acting. Perhaps she is not quite ready for this hop-over.