Family of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi say no settlement has been discussed

Jamal Khashoggi was killed on Oct. 2 at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul after he went to get marriage documents. (File/AFP)
Updated 11 April 2019

Family of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi say no settlement has been discussed

  • In a statement posted on Twitter by Salah Khashoggi, Jamal’s son, the family condemned “recent attempts to smear his legacy and draw friction are ill and immoral”
  • The statement praised King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman as the “guardians to all Saudis.”

JEDDAH: The family of murdered Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi said on Wednesday they have not discussed a settlement in relation to his killing. 

In a statement posted on Twitter by Salah Khashoggi, Jamal’s son, the family condemned “recent attempts to smear his legacy and draw friction are ill and immoral.”

US media recently reported that the family had received compensation for the murder from the Saudi government.

“The trial is taking place and no settlement discussion had been or is discussed. The people who committed and were involved in this crime will all be brought to justice and face punishment.”

The statement praised King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman as the “guardians to all Saudis.”

“Acts of generosity and humanity come from the high moral grounds they possess, not admission of guilt or scandal.”

Saudi Arabia late last year indicted 11 people for the killing at the Kingdom’s consulate in Istanbul in October. Prosecutors are seeking the death penalty against five of them.

More to follow ... 


Organization of Islamic Cooperation to adopt Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam

Updated 28 February 2020

Organization of Islamic Cooperation to adopt Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam

  • OIC secretary-general notes that the organization continues to condemn the ideological rhetoric adopted by terrorist groups

JEDDAH: Secretary-General of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) Dr. Yousef bin Ahmad Al-Othaimeen announced on Wednesday that the OIC will adopt the Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam (CDHRI) after it is revised in accordance with international human-rights standards. The foreign ministers of the OIC member states are expected to approve the CDHRI at their meeting in Niamey, Niger in April.

 Al-Othaimeen was speaking at the 43rd session of the United Nations Human Rights Council (HRC), held in Geneva on Wednesday, where he highlighted some of the efforts the OIC has made to fight racism and xenophobia — including Islamophobia — claiming that they are the result of “intellectual and political resistance to cultural pluralism.”

He said the OIC, in cooperation with its partners, has prepared “a comprehensive and consensual approach to address incitement to hatred, discrimination and violence on the basis of religion.”

Al-Othaimeen’s speech, which was delivered on his behalf by OIC Geneva Permanent Representative Nassima Baghli, stressed that terrorism, including religious extremism, is a major source of concern for the international community. He pointed out that the OIC continues to condemn the ideological rhetoric adopted by terrorist groups and has established the Sawt Al-Hikma (Voice of Wisdom) Center, which focuses on addressing the ideological rhetoric of extremists.

His speech also reviewed the most common human-rights violations suffered by Muslims, referring to the detailed documentation from the UN’s own human rights bodies and the OIC of discrimination and violence against the Rohingya Muslims.

Al-Othaimeen explained that America’s actions in Palestine in recent months required the OIC to stress that any peace initiative between Israel and Palestine must be consistent with legitimate rights, foremost among which is the right to self-determination.

He also stressed the OIC’s support for Kashmiris in their pursuit of their legitimate right to self-determination in accordance with international resolutions and highlighted the OIC’s condemnation of Armenia’s continued occupation of Nagorno-Karabakh and seven regions bordering Azerbaijan.